YouTube hit Pomplamoose find success in Hyundai commercials

It’s one of those things you simply can’t resist — swaying along with a recent series of Hyundai car commercials that feature a delightful boy-girl duo trilling cotton-candyish Christmas carols.

You’ll hear-see them covering “Deck The Halls” for the company’s Genesis model; “Up On The Roof” for the Sonata; and “Jingle Bells” for the Accent, Elantra and Santa Fe.

But who, exactly, is this group?

Merely a couple of supersmart Stanford grads — Jack Conte and Nataly Dawn — who’ve become a YouTube hit as Pomplamoose, a name taken from the French for grapefruit.

Hyundai found the team through its ad agency, Innocean. They wanted a fresh, sparkling sound for their winter campaign, and Innocean found it.

According to multi-instrumentalist Conte (who also records solo), Pomplamoose has two basic rules: There will be no lip-syncing in any of their videos. And no hidden noises — you see every instrument being played. Which is perhaps why their personal YouTube channel currently has over 200,000 subscribers.

Check it out at here, or in regular rotation on most TV networks this season.

artsBackstage PassPomplamoosePop Music & JazzYouTube

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