Courtesy photoWynonna Judd appears in her “A Simpler Christmas” tour at the San Jose Civic Auditorium this week. The singer sought spiritual and philosophical guidance after facing several setbacks in recent years

Wynonna Judd shares her wisdom

At first, five-time Grammy winner Wynonna Judd might appear all campy, swaggering bravado.

“If only you knew how dangerous I am,” she mock-growls, discussing her current mood. “I am definitely a force to be reckoned with, and when I wake up, I have to lay in bed and do some deep breathing before I even hit the floor and the devil goes, ‘Oh, my God! She’s up!’”

She is justifiably proud of the projects she’s juggling: Her New York Times best-selling novel “Restless Heart”; a shoe line called Got Soul; the TV special “Wynonna and Cactus — The Road Back,” about her drummer-producer husband Cactus Moser’s recovery from a crippling motorcycle accident; and a reflective new album she is writing, led by the single “Something You Can’t Live Without.”

Her humor masks a deeper truth.

Gradually, over her 30-year career — first with her mother, Naomi, as powerhouse country duo The Judds, and now as a solo artist whose “A Simpler Christmas” tour hits San Jose this week — Judd has carefully gleaned wisdom from so many spiritual and philosophical sources, she could easily become a motivational speaker.

She happily shares this knowledge on her Twitter feed, like her recent Emerson-quotation post, “Always do what you are afraid to do.”

That’s why she subjected herself to the grueling reality show “Dancing With the Stars.” “Because I was terrified,” she admits. For every tragedy Judd has endured — many mentioned in her 2005 memoir “Coming Home to Myself” — she learned a transformative life lesson.

“Even when my husband had his accident and I was forced to go on the road without him, it made me realize how grateful I am to just stop and enjoy today,” she says. “And it’s biblical, too — you should only get the fruit for today. Get more than that? The rest rots.”

For years, Judd says, “because my mom and my sister [actress Ashley Judd] were sort of the intellectuals, and I was more the free-spirit, common-sense, road-gypsy wanderer, people saw that as a weakness and not a strength.”

Then it dawned on her that singing was her gift, her purpose. “And I finally had to make peace with the fact that I’m a visionary more than a day-to-day maintenance person,” she says.

Judd, 49, calls it “the prophet gift,” and it’s a blessing and a curse. For every great concept — like a line of bedazzled sneakers — she has to find the right professional team to execute it.

“But that’s what I tell my fans: ‘If it’s meant to be, it will not be a struggle,’” she says. “It will be so easy, it’ll almost seem like you’re getting away with something!’”

IF YOU GO

Wynonna Judd and The Big Noise

Where: San Jose Civic Auditorium, 135 W. San Carlos St., San Jose

When: 8 p.m. Wednesday

Tickets: $25 to $68

Contact: (408) 792-4111, www.sanjosecivic.comA Simpler ChristmasartsPop Music & JazzRestless HeartWynonna Judd

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