Where wine meets design

Modern and bold — two words to describe Cade winery, the new PlumpJack property and Napa Valley’s first LEED gold-certified, solar-powered winery.

Located 4.5 miles from Route 29 — Napa Country’s main drag of wineries and tasting rooms — Cade could not stand out more from its neighbors. Perched on a dramatic hillside of manzanita trees on Howell Mountain, the winery overlooks the Napa Valley for tens of miles — and enjoys a slightly cooler climate due to its elevation.

Designed by Juan Carlos Fernandez, 37, a Mexican-born architect part of Lail Design Group, Cade is elegant and unexpected.

Encompassing a 14,500-square-foot network of wine caves built into the hillside in a shape that replicates the PlumpJack shield, Cade — a name derived from a Shakespearean-era term for an oak cask or barrel — sits on approximately 60 hilltop acres — 20 of which were planted as vineyards in 2003. Of the remaining property, 28 acres are protected to ensure they will always remain open space.

Most recently, Cade became the first gold LEED-certified winery in California (It didn’t receive the U.S. Green Building Council’s top honor — platinum certification in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — mainly because there isn’t a network of public transportation connecting the winery to the rest of the community).

With an emphasis on environmentally-sensitive design, Cade utilizes solar power, organic farming methods and other “green” elements in both wine production and daily operations.

A visit to CADE
When you schedule a visit ($20 a person), you will be invited to sit and sip at the hospitality building’s outdoor patio, which features an infinity-edge fountain that overlooks the bucolic valley. If it is too hot or sunny, you can relax inside the hospitality building’s living room, an open space with a large coffee table, sofas and white Barcelona chairs. Adjacent to the living room is an elegant dining area — with a dramatic manzanita chandelier — which is available for private events.

During a tasting, you’ll receive four samples — 2008 Cade Sauvignon Blanc ($26), 2006 Cade Napa Cuvée Cabernet Sauvignon ($60), 2006 Cade Cabernet Sauvignon Howell Mountain ($68) and 2006 Cade Estate Cabernet Sauvignon Howell Mountain ($126) — all of which are available for purchase by the bottle.

Cade’s production is under the direction of award-winning winemaker Anthony Biagi, known for his critically acclaimed estate cabernets as the winemaker for PlumpJack Winery. Biagi has plans for an overall production of 12,500 cases over the next 10 years.

In addition to wine, it is well worth your time to schedule a tour of the winemaking facility, which features two buildings and a barrel storage cave.

 

 

If you go

Howell Mountain, Angwin, Cade Winery and Tasting Room

Where: 360 Howell Mountain Road South, Angwin 94508
Info: (707) 965-2746 or visit www.cadewinery.com

Bargain


Tasting tour of Cade Winery

$20 to $30 a person

Tastings and tours at Cade Winery are open to the public by appointment; tastings from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week at a cost of $20 per person. Private tours followed by a food and wine pairing are available at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. daily at a cost of $30 a person. For more information, visit www.cadewinery.com.

Splurge

Spending a night near Cade
Starting at $575 a night

Meadowood Napa Resort — which recently ranked ninth among the top 50 resorts in the U.S. and Canada by Travel + Leisure Magazine — is a memorable experience and in close proximity to Cade winery. The resort — which features 85 cottages, suites and lodges — is settled into the forested hillside of the Napa Valley. It is also home to a two-Michelin starred restaurant, a professional croquet lawn, tennis center, three pools, a spa and miles of hiking trails. For more information, visit www.meadowood.com.

Life by Numbers

Acres on which Cade winery is located on Howell Mountain in the Napa Valley
60

Miles from San Francisco to Cade Winery
74
 
Square-feet that make up the network of wine caves at Cade Winery
14,500

artsCADEentertainmentOther Artsplumpjack

Just Posted

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Alison Collins says that she and other members of San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education facing potential recall “represent constituents that are often erased or talked over.” <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Is the Black Cat incident a distraction from the recovery of The City’s storied nightlife industry or does Mayor London Breed’s behavior inadvertently highlight the predicament the industry’s been in since San Francisco reinstated indoor mask requirements on Aug. 20?<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner, 2021)</ins>
Club owners to maskless mayor: Are we the new fun police?

Black Cat affair highlights difficult recovery for nightlife industry

BART’s Powell Street station in The City was the site of a fatal accident on Sept. 13.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Powell Station death serves as a grim reminder. BART doors don’t stop for anyone

What you need to know about safety sensors on the trains

Most Read