Website launches first global climate art project

To raise awareness about climate change, Heidi Quante, coordinator of 350 EARTH, recently launched the world’s first ever global climate art project. From Nov. 20-28, artists across the globe created installations large enough to be seen from space. For information, visit 350.org.

What does the 350 mean? The goal of the organization is to get the world back to 350 parts per million of carbon in the atmosphere. We need this amount in order for life as we know it to continue; right now we’re at 390 parts per million.

Why did you start the 350 EARTH campaign? When people see the Earth from a satellite view, they often shift their perception and see it as one planet and it’s all we have. It’s important for us to look at ourselves from the outside and realize that we all share the same home.

What makes art a good tool for the climate change movement? Throughout history, art has played such a huge role in getting the general public to understand what’s at stake. Art can tap into people’s emotional side and get them to see things in a new light; statistics and fact sheets don’t move people in the same way.

Why is this cause so important to you? This planet is the only one we have; the Earth can exist without humans, but we can’t exist without the Earth.

3-Minute Interviewclimate changeFeaturesPersonalitiesSan Francisco

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