WaPo agrees: Plame movie trying to falsify history

I pointed out a few ways in Fair Game, the new movie based on Joe Wilson's and Valerie Plame's memoirs ignore facts inconvenient to their tale (mostly, that the leaker and the leaked-to both opposed the invasion of Iraq). Walter Pincus and Richard Leiby at the Post wrote this:

The movie holds up as a thoroughly researched and essentially accurate account — albeit with caveats. It's told from the point of view of Joe Wilson and Valerie Plame Wilson, upon whose separate memoirs the script is based. The CIA and the Bush White House will clearly disagree with its telling of events.

The Post's editors, however, don't pull any punches in an editorial today:

“Fair Game,” based on books by Mr. Wilson and his wife, is full of distortions – not to mention outright inventions….

Hollywood has a habit of making movies about historical events without regard for the truth; “Fair Game” is just one more example. But the film's reception illustrates a more troubling trend of political debates in Washington in which established facts are willfully ignored.

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

SF Pride membership votes to ban Google from parade. Will the board listen?

San Francisco Pride’s membership voted Wednesday night to kick Google out of… Continue reading

SF Zoo Koala naming contest to raise money for Australian wildlife

A naming contest for a koala at the San Francisco Zoo aims… Continue reading

Police Commission urges SF to address homelessness with health workers instead of cops

Resolution calls on Mayor London Breed, Board of Supervisors to pursue a new approach

California, 13 other states sue to stop Trump’s food stamp cuts

By Jackie Botts, CalMatters Fourteen states, including California, filed suit Thursday against… Continue reading

49ers Emmanuel Sanders will suit up Sunday for his third championship game

As a rookie out of SMU, the 5-foot-11 receiver wasn’t afraid of the biggest moment at that point of his young NFL career.

Most Read