From left, Amy Adams and Christian Bale play Lynne and Dick Cheney, and Sam Rockwell and Andrea Wright play George and Laura Bush in “Vice.” (Courtesy Matt Kennedy/ Annapurna Pictures)

‘Vice’ energetically details Dick Cheney’s rise to power

“Vice,” written and directed by Adam McKay, is messy going as it chronicles Dick Cheney’s Machiavellian rise from boozing lout to democracy-crushing de facto commander. But this bio-comedy and political crazy quilt is nonetheless winningly energetic and imaginative.

McKay taps into somewhat recent history, depicts egregious behavior and employs a playful, anything-goes storytelling style in this follow-up to his similarly crafted “The Big Short.”

A transformed Christian Bale plays Cheney, who’s a drunken underachiever, booted from Yale, when we meet him in Wyoming in 1963. When his fiancee, Lynne (Amy Adams), tells him she won’t marry a loser, Cheney promises not to disappoint her again. He keeps his word, sometimes chillingly.

He becomes a Capitol Hill lackey, assisting brash, crude congressman Donald Rumsfeld (Steve Carell). Plum legislative and administrative jobs follow. Both lucky and stealthy, Cheney enters the White House power core. In 2000, George W. Bush (Sam Rockwell), portrayed as a malleable dolt, asks Cheney to be his running mate. Cheney accepts, after manipulating Bush to expand vice-presidential powers.

Immediately following the 9/11 attacks, a barely hinged Cheney is running the show. His behind-the-scenes maneuvers lead to the U.S. invasion of Iraq. That war killed hundreds of thousands of Iraqi civilians. Cheney’s legacy also includes torture.

Cheney demonstrates decency only as a family man. When daughter Mary (Alison Pill) comes out as a lesbian, he responds supportively, though things get thorny when daughter Liz (Lily Rabe) opposes gay marriage when running for senator.

How does a monotone bureaucrat with zero charisma become the most powerful VP in U.S. history and possibly the most powerful man on Earth? Addressing that question, often through a mysterious narrator, McKay focuses on Cheney’s keen ability to recognize and grab every choice opportunity.

Not a graceful filmmaker, McKay fills the movie with stylistically incompatible comic devices and more informational bits than we can process. Cheney’s heart attacks unsubtly symbolize a rotten heart. A waiter reading from a torture-related menu has a sketch-TV quality.

Yet McKay delivers so much creative energy and Bale is so scarily Cheney-like that the film prompts enough laughs and contains enough sizzling truths to overcome its flaws, whether Dick and Lynne are engaging in McKay-scripted “Macbeth”-style pillow talk or Cheney is dangerously enhancing presidential authority.

And the violations of democracy seen onscreen can’t help but suggest the current Washington scene.

While Bale’s Cheney indeed benefits from ace makeup artistry, and looks convincingly balder and fleshier as the years progress, the actor goes beyond the physical. He conveys a growing contemptuousness and Cheney/Bale’s smirky impressions transcend imitation. When Cheney senses an opportunity to seize power, a spark faintly but unsettlingly flickers in Bale’s eyes.

Adams, playing, essentially, Lady Macbeth lite, is excellent as always, but can do only so much with her role. Rockwell and Carell, in tune with McKay’s spiritedness, are one-dimensional but entertaining support.

REVIEW
Vice
Three stars
Starring: Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell
Written and directed by: Adam McKay
Rated: R
Running time: 2 hours, 12 minutes
Adam McKayAmy AdamsChristian BaleDick CheneyGeorge W. BushMovies and TVSam RockwellSteve CarellVice

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Breed declares local emergency to counter threat of coronavirus

City officials warn against discrimination while they prepare for the possibility of an outbreak.

Educators warn of possible strike after district calls for budget cuts, layoffs

SFUSD faces up to $31.8 million shortfall in current school year

Tumlin apologizes after Muni subway suffers five breakdowns in three hours

Agency working on fixes for aging train control system and cars

SF approves facility for homeless youth in Lower Nob Hill

Approval of navigation center latest expansion in city portfolio of shelter beds

Man suing SFPD alleging officers beat him with batons

Cop attorney fires back: police were ‘interrupting a dangerous domestic violence incident’

Most Read