U.K. singer Foxes is off to a speedy start

Louisa Rose Allen — who performs under the name Foxes — recently completed her debut album, “Glorious,” after working long hours into the night at a studio in Britain’s countryside. On the phone just hours after she wrapped the dark-themed recording, she was feeling triumphant, and understandably so. Her other recent breakthroughs: last year’s introductory EP, “Warrior,” a new five-cut remix disc of her ethereal synth-rocking sonnet “Youth” and a cameo on the top-10 Zedd single “Clarity.” Only 24, Allen is destined to be a star. For the time being, though, she has moved from her London flat back into her childhood home in Southampton, where her family was good-naturedly razzing her so much, she finally shouted, “I’m doing an interview! Shut the door!”

What kind of kid were you in school? I was quite a loser. I was very quiet and I just kept to myself, and I actually didn’t go in very much. So I was probably known as “the girl who was never there.” And my mom didn’t know, but I was quite good at bouncing out of school. There was a thing where you could sign yourself out if you had a letter from your parents, so I used to fake the letter. So I was a forger, basically.

But your mom came up with your name, Foxes, from a dream she had about a fox, running barking down the street. My mom is brilliant! She’s the biggest hippie ever, and yeah, she had this crazy dream about a fox. But she actually brought my sister and brother and me up to be very free and just do what you wanted to do and follow your dreams and all that jazz. So the best lesson she taught me is that you should always be doing what you have a passion for. So for me, growing up and being a singer was something that a lot of people thought was a pipe dream. But she was always telling me that if you work hard enough for something, eventually it will become your job.

When and how did you start singing? I was that annoying kid that would run around the house with spoons, singing Disney songs. I would literally bang spoons together and sing songs like “A Whole New World” — that was a big one in my youth. So as you can imagine, that was not the nicest of noises to be around.

When did your mom start encouraging you to pursue this as profession? Probably when I put the spoons down! Ha! That’s when I picked up a microphone instead!

IF YOU GO

Foxes

Where: New Parish, 579 18th St., Oakland

When: 9 p.m. Friday

Tickets: $15

Info: (415) 371-1631, www.snagtickets.comartsFoxesGloriousLouisa Rose AllenPop Music & Jazz

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

BART Ambassadors are being called on to assist riders in social situations that don’t require police force. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Unarmed BART ambassadors program formalized with a focus on community service

Public safety and police reform are key elements in campaigns of Board members Dufty and Simon

San Francisco DJ and producer Jah Yzer livestreams most mornings from his home. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Roots & Tings build community through music

Lateef the Truthspeaker, Jah Yzer and Winstrong call for voting as a form of healing

On Oct. 13, people lined up to vote early for the presidential election in Southlake, Texas. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>
<ins></ins>
Five things to watch for in the run-up to Nov. 3

Down-ballot races, as much as the presidency, will determine the future course of this nation

WeChat (Shutterstock)
U.S. District Court denies Trump request to shutdown WeChat app

A federal judge in San Francisco denied a request by the U.S.… Continue reading

School board members Gabriela Lopez (left) and Alison Collins (right) say they have been the subject of frequent hateful, racist and sexist attacks during their time on the school board. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F Examiner)
Angered by Lowell decision, SFUSD grad targets school board members with violent imagery

Facebook page depicts two women of color on board with swastikas and x-marks on their faces

Most Read