Travel tips: Money no object, bargain hunting

If money is no object, The Examiner's Kathleen Jay recommends a stay at the Halekulani luxury resort on Waikiki Beach in Oahu.

What: Ultimate luxury on Oahu

How much: $6,000 for Vera Wang two-bedroom suite

Why: Looking for the ultimate luxurious experience in Oahu? Look no further than the Halekulani (“House Befitting Heaven”), a luxury resort on five acres of beachfront property that has been hosting visitors to Waikiki Beach for nearly 100 years. The 455-room resort is surrounded by open courtyards and lush gardens, and guest facilities include three restaurants, three cocktail lounges, pool, spa, fitness room, business center and hospitality suite. As a member of the Leading Hotels of the World, the hotel holds the AAA Five-Diamond Award, a 2007 Mobil TravelGuide Four-Star award, and Travel + Leisure’s 2007 “World’s Best Hotel Service” in its annual reader’s poll.

For more information, call (800) 367-2343 or visit www.halekulani.com. Room rates start at $405 per night.

Bargain hunter

What: Camping on Oahu

How much: Very cheap

Why: On Windward Coast, pitch your tent at the 400-acre Hoomaluhia Botanical Gardens. Located half an hour from downtown Honolulu, it features a 32-acre lake in the middle of the scenic park, and there are numerous hiking trails.

For more information and camping rules, visit www.honolulu.gov/parks/hbg/hmbg.htm or call (808) 233-7323.

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