Tom Green breaks out with new standup act

Tom Green would be the first to admit he’s got the brass to do most anything, and lately, it has nothing to do with having survived testicular cancer or proving that his web television talk show, “Tom Green’s House Tonight,” can generate an audience.

These days, Green has boldly gone back to his roots. Earlier this year, he launched his “World Standup Comedy Tour,” which comes to Cobb’s Comedy Club in San Francisco this weekend.

“It’s probably been the most fun year I’ve had in a long time,” Green says. “I’ve been doing my Web television show — I built a studio in my living room — and threw myself into it and after four years of doing anything that intensively, it just makes you want to take a beat for a second. Especially when it involves you being in your living room. I wanted to get out.”

Make that way out. Anybody familiar with Green’s artistic verve already knows just how distinctly unique his fin-de-siecle shock comedy actually is.

What began as a modestly assembled show on Canadian cable TV in the 1990s eventually morphed into a winning outing with “The Tom Green Show” on MTV.

Movies such as “Freddy Got Fingered,” “Road Trip” and “Charlie’s Angels” shot his celebrity into greater orbit and, when things seemed creatively dry — by modern media standards — he surprised most by launching his Web talk show.

As for the comedy tour, he says some of the decision to do it had something to do with “going through a midlife crisis.”

“I’m hitting a certain point in my life where, I guess, I’m an adult now,” he says. “I just turned 39. I have different outlooks of the world. I’m in a different comfort zone. I just feel more comfortable getting up onstage and speaking my mind about a lot of things because I’ve been though things, and I’ve had some time to think about them and formulated some opinions.”

That said, expect modern technology, today’s media and Facebook to be on Green’s hit list.

“I’ve always identified what’s not being done and I take that on in an attempt to highlight it,” he says, “but sometimes, it can be a double-edged sword because you’re taking on the mainstream.”

Fortunately, Green knows they can take it.

IF YOU GO
Tom Green

Where: Cobb’s Comedy Club, 915 Columbus Ave., San Francisco
When: 8 and 10:15 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 8 p.m. Sunday
Tickets: $23.50 to $25.50
Contact: (415) 928-4320, www.cobbscomedyclub.com

artsentertainmentNEPOther ArtsTom Green

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