Theater: Borel presents a youthful musical ‘Cinderella’

Borel Dream Theater presents the timeless fairy tale “Cinderella” this weekend at Bayside Performing Arts Center in San Mateo.

Rodgers & Hammerstein wrote the musical specifically for television in 1957 — the only show they wrote just for TV. The story stays true to the original tale written in 1697 by Charles Perrault.

The show, featuring students at Borel Middle School, is double-cast, allowing as many young actors as possible to appear in major roles.

“This is a growing experience for our students balancing singing, dancing and acting,” director Desiree Toledo said. “This show was specifically chosen for this age group, because they show a sense of hope, wonder and good feeling. My goal is to give them an uplifting and positive experience. They are learning to rely on and trust each other, being part of a team. This concept comes together in the musical when the song ‘Impossible’ is immediately followed by ‘It’s Possible.’

Performances are Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at 2025 Kehoe Ave. Tickets are $7 to $10 and are available at the door or by e-mailing lavenderhills@comcast.net.

Spindrift one-acts

You’re onstage in a packed theater in the midst of “Macbeth” and you suddenly have forgotten all your lines. It’s an actor’s worst nightmare. Such is the basis of “The Actor’s Nightmare,” a one-act play presented by Pacifica Spindrift Players, along with “The Dating Games,” both running May 23 through June 15.

Written by Christopher Durang, the popular “Actor’s Nightmare” was first presented in New York in 1981. The main character George, an accountant, discovers himself on a stage in a leading role with no clue about what play he is in. Yet the directors and others actors are unaware of his predicament, and think he is an accomplished performer.

The nightmare continues as George finds himself with lines from the likes of “Private Lives,” “Hamlet,” “A Man for All Seasons,” and even Samuel Beckett’s “Happy Days.”

Meanwhile, “The Dating Games,” by Peninsula playwright VB Leghorn, explores various stories of modern love and dating, including the question of whether the voice on a global positioning system device can fall in love with the person driving the car.

That fantasy is one of several vignettes in the show. Some are set in the present — for example, sketches about speed dating and Internet dating — while others are projected in the future.

Director John Hull describes the show as “an absurd comedy using dream logic as opposed to real world logic. They all have a clever comic twist, making them charming.”

The Pacifica Spindrift Players theater is at 1050 Crespi Drive. For information, call (650) 359-8002 or visit www.pacificaspindriftplayers.org.

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