The versatility of Natalia Kills

Outside of Hollywood retirement homes, few folks can claim the same career-launching medium as 24-year-old British chanteuse Natalia Kills: Radio drama.

The exotic Jamaican-Uruguayan beauty born Natalia Cappuccini first found work on BBC TV a decade ago, playing the rebellious daughter Sima on the popular family sitcom “All About Me.”

“I would bring boys home and kiss them on the couch and get into all kinds of trouble, and I did that for three years,” she says, describing her campy role. “But around the same time, I got an opportunity to be on something similar on the radio, a soap opera that’s been going for over 50 years called ‘The Archers.’”

Kills — who’ll be touting her upcoming debut disc “Perfectionist,” opening for Robyn Tuesday at the Warfield — was offered the “Archers” part of Amy, the vicar’s less-uppity offspring.

It’s an American anachronism, but in England the old-time radio serial is still thriving. “Because they have a film set, they basically do everything you do on a TV show, but without a camera,” she says. “They have tons of microphones set up, so when you’re in the kitchen, you have to walk into a kitchen. It’s not faked or anything. And they have halls and atriums for when you do different event scenes, a room for every type of noise someone would experience on a daily basis.”

How did the young thespian wind up on Black Eyed Peas frontman will.i.am’s Cherrytree-distributed imprint? She had quietly been composing songs that were picked up in the U.S. by TV shows such as “Entourage.”

“So finally, I decided to work on my own music and write songs for myself,” she says. Her first MySpace-posted demo caught the ear of Perez Hilton, who championed it on his website.

Overnight, Kills had 2 million plays and 50,000 new fans.

After being wined and dined by every label and producer in Los Angeles, Kills settled on will.i.am.

“He gave me the tools to be as creative as I wanted to be, to make what I wanted to make, and to discover my own personal sound,” she says of her benefactor, who also helped her direct her own web miniseries, and even a movie she filmed to accompany “Perfectionist.”

Now Kills’ hard-edged songs will probably hit radio, like “Zombie,” “Superficial” and “Love Is a Suicide.”

“The album’s definitely very aggressive for normal pop music, but that’s just my style,” she says. “And it has nothing to do with perfection. It’s about going through extreme hardship, heartbreak and disappointment, and finding your own happiness through those things.”

IF YOU GO

Natalia Kills

Opening for Robyn

Where: Warfield, 982 Market St., San Francisco

When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday

Tickets: $22.25 to $32.25

Contact: (800) 745-3000; www.ticketmaster.com

artsentertainmentmusicNatalia KillsPop Music & Jazz

Just Posted

Dominion Voting Systems, a Denver-based vendor, is under contract to supply voting machines for elections in San Francisco. (Kevin N. Hume/Examiner file)
Is San Francisco’s elections director impeding voting machine progress?

Open source technology could break up existing monopoly

The 49ers take on the Packers in Week 3 of the NFL season, before heading into a tough stretch of divisional opponents. (Courtesy San Francisco 49ers)
‘Good for Ball’ or ‘Bad for Ball’ — A Niners analysis

By Mychael Urban Special to The Examiner What’s the first thing that… Continue reading

Health experts praised Salesforce for keeping its Dreamforce conference at Moscone Center outdoors and on a small scale. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Happy birthday, Marc Benioff. Your company did the right thing

Salesforce kept Dreamforce small, which made all kinds of sense

Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, pictured with Rose Pak in 2014, says the late Chinatown activist was “helping to guide the community away from the divisions, politically.”
Willie and Rose: How an alliance for the ages shaped SF

How the Mayor and Chinatown activist shaped San Francisco, then and now

The Grove in Golden Gate Park is maintained largely by those who remember San Francisco’s 20,000 AIDS victims.<ins> (Open Eye Pictures/New York Times)</ins>
Looking at COVID through the SF prism of AIDS

AIDS took 40 years to claim 700,000 lives. COVID surpassed that number in 21 months

Most Read