The sound of music to come

Tickets of all prices for classical performances around San Francisco

Classical-music performances — small or big, free or expensive — will pick up in the next couple of months pretty much where they left off just before the holidays. Here are a few recommendations for the new year:

» If you are familiar with Robert Greenberg’s work, you are likely to attend his next lecture. If you

haven’t yet experienced this uniquely entertaining (and illuminating) musicologist in action, here’s your chance: he will lecture on “Beethoven’s Revolution” at 2 p.m. Jan. 6 in Herbst Theatre, Veterans Building, 401 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, in a San Fracnisco Performances presentation. San Francisco Performances subcribers may add the event to any series order for $20. For information, call (415) 398-6449 or visit www.performances.org.

» A grand old man of music, conductor Kurt Masur, and young veteran virtuoso Sarah Chang will collaborate at the next San Francisco Symphony subscription series, in the romantic sweep of the Bruch Violin Concerto; Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3 (the “Scottish”), and Richard Strauss’ “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks” complete the program. The program runs Jan. 10 through Jan. 14, Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave. Tickets are $37-$110. Call (415) 864-6000 or visit www.sfsymphony.org.

» Good music, for free, and the excitement of discovering future stars for yourself — that’s the promise of student recitals at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music’s spanking new building, at 50 Oak St., in the Civic Center. A few examples: violinist Christine Choi, 8 p.m., Jan. 23; violinists Alexa Beattie and Maria Korndorfer in a joint recital, 8 p.m., Jan. 26; graduate recital by harpist Kristal Schwartz, 5 p.m., Jan. 27. Again, these and many other recitals, concerts, and master classes are open to the public, free. Call (415) 864-7326 or visit www.sfcm.edu/.

» In addition performances in Belvedere (Jan. 19), Berkeley (Jan. 20), and Davis (Jan. 22), the American Bach Soloists’ next program will come to San Francisco, at 7 p.m. Jan. 21, in St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 1111 O’Farrell St. Four Bach “new year cantatas” will be heard, featuring tenor Steven Tharp, baritone William Sharp, and members of the Pacific Boychoir. Tickets are $10-$42. Call (415) 621-7900 or visit www.americanbach.org.

» Symphony Parnassus is a community organization, led by Stephen Paulson, exhibiting some serious professional qualities, featuring big-name soloists. The next concert, at 3 p.m., Jan. 21, in Herbst Theatre at 401 Van Ness Ave., will feature soprano Lisa Vroman in Kurt

Weill’s “Seven Deadly Sins,” Prokofiev’s “Lieutenant Kije Suite,” and Richard Strauss’ “Don Juan.” Tickets are $10-$22. Call (415) 392-4400 or visit www.symphonyparnassus.org.

» At a time of an earthquake swarm in the area, the designation “6.5” sounds risky, but the San Francisco Symphony persists on using the name for its 6:30 p.m. special concerts on Fridays. The early start, a slightly abbreviated program, and a lecture-demonstration-concert format provide listeners with a different kind of experience. Conductor Lawrence Foster and pianist Radu Lupu will be in front of the orchestra on Jan. 26, in Davies Symphony Hall. Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 and Roberto Gerhard’s Concerto for Orchestra are on tap. Tickets are $37-$110. Call (415) 864-6000 or visit www.sfsymphony.org.

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