The Bats have flapped back into the belfry with new album

Another reason to be cheerful.

New Zealand’s brainy chime-rockers The Bats have flapped back into the belfry, with a brand-new album, “Free All The Monsters,” their first in three years, hitting these shores on Nov. 22.

More good news: It’s being released on their classic old imprint Flying Nun Records, a label that’s been defining the Kiwi sound for three decades. Currently, the group is heading out on a homeland tour that’s celebrating Flying Nun’s prestigious 30th Anniversary.

Bandleader Robert Scott has stayed busy with several side projects over the years, including reunions with his old outfit The Clean. But he’s maintained his original Bats lineup throughout that time, as well, including fellow guitarist/vocalist Kaye Woodward, bassist Paul Grant and drummer Malcolm Grant.

In keeping with their wonderfully eccentric worldview, the band recorded “Monsters” at Seacliff, a former Victorian lunatic asylum outside of Dunedin, New Zealand, with old Clean knob-twiddler Dale Cotton producing.

Welcome The Bats’ return at www.thebats.co.nz, and celebrate 30 years of great Kiwi rock at www.flyingnun.co.nz.

artsBackstage PassNew ZealandPop Music & JazzSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Man suing SFPD alleging officers beat him with batons

Cop attorney fires back: police were ‘interrupting a dangerous domestic violence incident’

Nuru corruption scandal prompts call to boost Ethics Commission budget

Watchdog agency lacks staff, resources to carry out its duties

Supes to boost subpoena power

Peskin legislation would allow committee to compel testimony under oath

Drug overdose deaths surpass 300 in San Francisco

Three-year rise in fatalities ‘generally driven by fentanyl’

Preston finds support for District 5 navigation center at community meeting

Supervisor hopes to narrow down list of possible locations within months

Most Read