Take me out to — the San Francisco Opera

With its marble foyer and vaulted ceilings, San Francisco’s War Memorial Opera House on Van Ness Avenue can be more than a little intimidating — and maybe a tad over budget for families with young children, college students, and the elderly on fixed incomes.

On Friday, Sept. 28, however, the people behind the elegant galas will team up with AT&T Park to offer a live simulcast of “Samson and Delilah” straight from the opera-house stage to the ballpark’s new high-definition scoreboard — for free.

With a backdrop of the San Francisco Bay, consider it a blend of hot dogs and beer and updos and sports coats. Those interested in attending should print free tickets from www.sfopera.com/giants and bring blankets for limited lawn seating for the 8 p.m. show. So far, about 30,000 people have reserved seats.

“We are excited to bring a new twist to the traditional opera in the park that only we can with one of the most technologically advanced ballparks in the country,” said Larry Baer, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the San Francisco Giants.

Since becoming general director of the San Francisco Opera in 2006, David Gockley has worked to bring opera to The City’s larger community. Tonight’s event will be the Bay Area’s fourth free simulcast under Gockley’s direction.

Saint-Saëns’ “Samson and Delilah,” the epic musical story of a hero who loses his heart, his hair and finally his strength, will be broadcast from the War Memorial Opera House on Van Ness Avenue to a 3,200-square-foot high-definition scoreboard at the ballpark. While Barry Bonds will likely not be there, baseball-opera fans will be able to enjoy baseball concessions.

“We have a desire to share what we’re doing with a much wider audience because opera has a huge impact on people emotionally and artistically,” said Matthew Shilvock, director of new initiatives for the San Francisco Opera.

“There’s a lot of barriers people bring to opera because it’s a quite complex art from, by taking it outside and where people can come for free, they candecide whether they like it,” he added

artsentertainmentOther Arts

Just Posted

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Speaker of the Parliament of Mongolia Gombojav Zandanshatar said his country and San Francisco face similar challenges on issues including COVID recovery and climate change.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Mongolian leaders meet with tech, film leaders on city tour

‘I really want San Franciscans to meet the new Mongolian generation’

Most Read