Symphony presents unique ‘three-in-one’ concert

San Francisco Symphony’s “Conductors on the Podium” program this week offers something new: three behind-the-scenes in-house conductors appearing in one performance: Associate conductor James Gaffigan, chorus director Ragnar Bohlin and resident conductor Benjamin Shwartz will take turns at the podium in performances Thursday through Saturday.

The program features Bartók’s “Suite from The Miraculous Mandarin” and Poulenc’s “Figure humaine” sung a cappella by the chorus. Also on the bill is the world premiere of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s “Asteroids” led by Shwartz, whose résumé also includes conducting the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra, Nate Stookey’s Junkestra and collaborations with DJ/composer Mason Bates.

Performances are Thursday at 2 p.m.; Friday at 6:30 p.m. and Saturday at 8 p.m. at Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. Susan Key gives “Inside Music” talks one hour before the Thursday and Saturday concerts. Tickets are $25 to $125; call (415) 864-6000 or visit www.sfsymphony.org.

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