Symphony opening leads Wednesday events in San Francisco

Violin great Itzhak Perlman — along with pianist Lang Lang — are the special guests as the San Francisco Symphony opens its 100th season with a concert and gala festivities. [8 p.m.

Violin great Itzhak Perlman — along with pianist Lang Lang — are the special guests as the San Francisco Symphony opens its 100th season with a concert and gala festivities. [8 p.m.

WHO’S IN TOWN
Violin great Itzhak Perlman — along with pianist Lang Lang — are the special guests as the San Francisco Symphony opens its 100th season with a concert and gala festivities. [8 p.m., Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]


Lectures

Retirement living: Speakers provide the facts about the costs of retirement living options. [5:15 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

Arts grants: Creative Work Fund hosts a workshop for artists and nonprofits interested in applying for grants for projects featuring media or performing artists. [6 p.m., Ninth Street Independent Film Center, 145 Ninth St., S.F.]

John Santos: The Latin-jazz artist and ethnomusicologist presents this week’s lecture in his series exploring the history and relevance of Cuban Son music and dance. [7 p.m., Museum of the African Diaspora, 685 Mission St., S.F.]

‘SOCAP11’: Conference convenes top players in the world of social-capital markets. Discussion topics include ways to direct market systems in support of social and economic causes. [8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Fort Mason Center, Marina Boulevard and Buchanan Street, S.F.]

Literary events
Justin Torres: The fiction writer launches “We the Animals.” [7:30 p.m., Books Inc., 2275 Market St., S.F.]

Two mystery novelists: Ellen Crosby (“The Sauvignon Secret”) and Denise Hamilton (“Damage Control”) read from their books. [7 p.m., “M” Is for Mystery, 86 E. Third Ave., San Mateo]

Mary Jo McConahay:
The journalist talks about “Maya Roads: One Woman’s Journey Among the People of the Rainforest.” [7:30 p.m., Booksmith, 1644 Haight St., S.F.]

At the colleges
Amie Siegel: The artist, whose work involves film, video, sound and writing, discusses her work. [7:30 p.m., San Francisco Art Institute, 800 Chestnut St., S.F.]

Faculty concert: Members of Stanford’s piano faculty perform a concert. Proceeds go toward the purchase of pianos for the university’s piano programs. [8 p.m., Dinkelspiel Auditorium, Stanford University, Stanford]


At the public library

Opera lecture: The San Francisco Opera Guild presents a lecture on the opera “Heart of a Soldier” by Christopher Theofanidis. [Noon, Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Radar Reading series: Emerging and underground authors share their work. Michelle Tea hosts the event. [6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Room, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]


Local activities

Indie theater: The Los Angeles-based “Four Clowns” — winner of the Hollywood Fringe Award for Best Physical Theatre — is among dozens of shows in the 12-day Fringe Festival featuring edgy fare at the Exit theaters in The City. [7 p.m. plus more performances, 156 Eddy St., S.F.; www.sffringe.org]

Independent Artists Week: Today’s event is a sustainable-fashion fair (clothing swap) featuring demonstrations and DIY tips. [8 p.m. to midnight, African American Art and Culture Complex, 762 Fulton St., S.F.]

Midday jazz: The Shotgun Wedding Quintet performs an outdoor concert presented by SFJazz. The group’s sound includes hip-hop, jazz and soul. [Noon, Levi’s Plaza, between Battery and Bay streets, off The Embarcadero, S.F.]

artsClassical Music & OperaeventsGood DaySan Francisco Symphony

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