Social Distortion cicada returns to The City

It’s a strange but truly apt metaphor: Every six or seven years, just like a cicada or AC/DC, Orange County rockers Social Distortion emerge from hiding with a gut-pummelling new album that shows every last punk-emo poseur just how it’s done, thank you very much.

So this January, right on schedule, Mike Ness and crew are issuing “Hard Times And Nursery Rhymes,” their long-awaited new outing on Epitaph. Its lead single, “Machine Gun Blues,” is already out.

“It’s fictional, but I tried to put myself in a gangster situation in 1934 — it’s my favorite genre,” explains the tattooed tough guy, who collects vintage suits, cars and jewelry from the era.

Wisely, then, the band just added a second show in February at San Francisco’s Warfield (982 Market St.; www.goldenvoice.com); now they’ll be knocking ’em dead on the 3rd and the 4th of the month.

And again, when entire generations come of age between Social Distortion releases, any youngster out there who hasn’t seen them live yet should do whatever it takes to make it to one of these shows. That old cicada Ness just might change your life.

artsBackstage PassMike NessPop Music & JazzSocial Distortion

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