Silly fun with teens in ‘Emo! The Musical’

Teen angst — it happens to the best of us. Take a second to reflect upon those melodramatic years and recall the disaffected youth you most identified with: Were you the misunderstood artiste, the perpetually stoned slacker or perhaps the sad-sack scribe of seriously bad poetry?

Joey Price, writer and director of “Emo! The Musical,” takes a look at one of the newer stereotypes, or subcultures, to infiltrate the high school campus: emo kids.

Emo is defined in three parts: One, a genre of music; two, an overemotional mentality; and three, a trend of fashion that incorporates tight jeans, angular haircuts and a disarming amount of black eyeliner.

Technically, emo is really just another outlet for hormonally charged adolescents to express themselves and establish an identity amid the throngs of high school cliques.

“[Emo! The Musical] is just a lot of silly fun and over-the-top ridiculousness,” says Price, who swears he never went through an emo phase, but was very much a theater geek.

“I like comedy a lot — it’s kind of my forte as an actor and as a writer — and I just always thought that being emo was pretty ridiculous. They say write what you know, and I always knew that emo was ridiculous so I went with it,” he says.

Price’s musical satire, which runs through Aug. 30 at Boxcar Theatre, uses the subculture as a point of reference to lampoon the absurdity of teen angst while also speaking to the importance of staying true to one’s own identity.

The story line of “Emo! The Musical” centers on underdog Chaz who, much to the objection of his emo companions, falls for a cheerleader. Chaz grapples with changing himself to appeal to the girl of his dreams while his friends do their best to thwart his attempt at dating out of his league.

There’s also a doozy of a non sequitur; things get thrown for a loop when an asteroid starts making its way toward Earth and jeopardizes the fate of mankind.

The obvious question at hand: Is there really a relationship between asteroids and emo kids? Nope. Price’s reasoning for throwing in the absurd plot twist was to simply “raise the stakes.”

“There is this sense of what would happen if an asteroid was coming to Earth and it was up to the emo kids to save it,” he says. “Would they even save it? Does that go against what they believe in? They’re pretty apathetic about things like that and maybe they wouldn’t save it.”

IF YOU GO

Emo! The Musical

When: 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; closes Aug. 30

Where: Boxcar Theatre, 505 Natoma St., San Francisco

Tickets: $15 to $30

Contact: (415) 814-2907, www.beardsbeardsbeards.com, www.brownpapertickets.com

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Harlan Kelly, head of the SFPUC and husband to City Administrator Naomi Kelly (right), faces federal charges for allegedly trading inside information on a city contract in return for a paid family vacation. (Courtesy photo)
Harlan Kelly, head of SFPUC, charged with fraud in widening Nuru scandal

Kelly accused of engaging in corrupt partnership with permit expediter

Jeff Tumlin, director of transportation for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, said the agency’s fiscal situation is “far worse” than the worse case scenarios projected back in April. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA prepares for massive potential layoffs as budget crisis continues to build

More than 1,200 full-time jobs on the line as agency struggles to close deficit

California Gov. Gavin Newsom is weighing further restrictions as COVID-19 cases rise. (Genaro Molina/Pool/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Newsom considering new shelter-in-place order as COVID-19 cases rise

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday warned that he may need to reinstate… Continue reading

Nicole Canedo looks at her City-issued Medical Reimbursement Account page on her computer outside her Berkeley apartment on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020. Canedo has worked numerous retail jobs in The City and the MRA has helped her with health costs. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Millions left sitting in medical reimbursement accounts by city workers

Health officials looking at how to improve access, outreach as untapped funds reach $409M

Andrew Faulk wrote "My Epidemic." (Courtesy photo)
Doctor’s memoir a fitting remembrance for World AIDS Day

‘My Epidemic’ tells personal stories of men who died

Most Read