“Anote’s Ark,” a film about Kiribati, a threatened island in Micronesia, screens Sept. 9 at Cowell Theater. (Courtesy photo)

SF Green Film fest tackles international environmental issues

“It’s elemental” is the theme of the eighth San Francisco Green Film Festival, an eight-day showcase of dozens of environmental films from across the world.

The eighth annual event — timed this year to coincide with the Global Climate Action Summit from Sept. 12-14 in The City, opens at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6 at the Castro with “Into The Okavango,” a film by Neil Gelinas about efforts to save Botswana’s threatened Okavango Delta. The “stunningly photographed” film follows South African conservation biologist Steve Boyes and a team of scientists, photographers, filmmakers and African guides on an epic four-month journey through the 22,000-square kilometer maze of wetlands in the Kalahari Desert as they track causes of the threats to the wildlife refuge.

The closing “big night,” also at the Castro, is “The Condor and Eagle.” Screening at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 13, the film by Sophie Guerra and Clément Guerra tells the stories of four indigenous leaders — Casey Camp-Horinek, Yudith Nieto, Melina Laboucan-Massimo and Bryan Parras — working for climate justice who embark on a journey from Canada’s plains to the Amazonian jungle.

In between are some 50 films (screening at Fort Mason, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, The Exploratorium) and more than 100 guest speakers taking on a wide variety of topics, from remote to all-encompassing.

“Anote’s Ark,” a 2018 Sundance Festival favorite about the remote Pacific Island nation of Kiribati which faces imminent annihilation from sea-level rise, and its leader Anote Tong’s measures to help his people, screens at 8 p.m. Sept. 9 at Fort Mason’s Cowell Theater.

In contrast, “Current Revolution,” director Roger Sorkin’s far-reaching examination of possible benefits resulting from reforming the electric grid in ways that combine efforts of utilities and the automotive and cybersecurity industries, screens at 4 p.m. Sept. 13 at YBCA.

There’s much more, too.

Tickets are $15, and $125 for a festival pass. For details, visit greenfilmfest.org.

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