Seasoned indie-pop from Schwartz

At 20, singer-songwriter Lucy Schwartz already has a fair amount of experience in the pop-music business, with two recordings and a bunch of songs featured in movies to her credit.

Creating music with a folk-indie influence along the lines of Regina Spektor, Feist and Fiona Apple, she seems to be taking her success in stride.

For example, she’s on a bill with the Weepies at the Great American Music Hall this weekend, part of a series of gigs that materialized after Internet encounters a while ago with the duo.

“I recorded nine songs, put them up on Myspace, was a fan of the Weepies and friended them,” says Schwartz, on the phone from her Southern California home. “They listened and liked them. I was so excited. Now it’s four years later and I’m opening for them.”

As a child, Schwartz knew she would do something creative as a career, but envisioned herself as more of an actress, painter or dancer than musician.

Her first performance was at age 7 as the Cowardly Lion, and she played numerous musical theater roles in high school.

But an upright piano in her house sparked her interest in playing music, and despite some frustration with lessons at first, she unleashed her songwriting creativity with encouragement from her teacher, Kia Colton.

With her biggest influences being “groups of four British men” — The Beatles and Coldplay — she began her professional career via a connection her dad, TV composer David Schwartz, made with the music director of the movie “The Women,” who needed tunes for the film.

“I think they were shocked it came from a high school girl,” Schwartz says of the tune “Count on Me,” which ended up in the closing credits.

She even met Mick Jagger, one of the movie’s producers, at the film’s premiere — although she was embarrassed when she approached him in a hyperfriendly manner and he didn’t know who she was.

She enjoys collaborations, especially a duet with Aqualung, “Seven Hours” — a bonus track on her new album, “Life in Letters” — and was thrilled to work with Sonya Tayeh of “So You Think You Can Dance,” who did the choreography on her video for “Graveyard.”

With a content yet excited tone, she says of the current state of her career: “You can collaborate in so many ways. Who wouldn’t want to work with people they admire?”

lkatz@sfexaminer.com

IF YOU GO

Lucy Schwartz

Opening for the Weepies

Where: Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St., San Francisco

When: 9 p.m. Saturday

Tickets: $21

Contact: (415) 885-0750, www.gamhtickets.com

artsentertainmentNEPOther Arts

Just Posted

A large crack winds its way up a sidewalk along China Basin Street in Mission Bay on Friday, Sept. 24, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco’s sinking sidewalks: Is climate change to blame?

‘In the last couple months, it’s been a noticeable change’

An empty residential care bed at the Broderick Street Adult Residential Facility. (Courtesy RAMS Inc.)
Can San Francisco stop the extinction of small assisted living facilities?

‘The impact is dramatic. These are the folks who built this city’

For years, Facebook employees have identified serious harms and proposed potential fixes. CEO Mark Zuckerberg, pictured in 2019, and COO Sheryl Sandberg have rejected the remedies, causing whisteblowers to multiply. (Eric Thayer/New York Times)
Facebook’s problems at the top: Social media giant is not listening to whistleblowers

Whistleblowers multiply, but Zuckerberg and Sandberg don’t heed their warnings

In California to date, only about 42% of guards and 57% of all prison staffers are fully vaccinated. (iStock)
Judge requires COVID vaccines for California prison guards

Mandate would ‘lower the risk of preventable death among incarcerated persons’

Maria Jimenez swabs her 7-year-old daughter Glendy Perez for a COVID-19 test at Canal Alliance in San Rafael on Sept. 25. (Penni Gladstone/CalMatters)
Rapid COVID-19 tests in short supply in California

‘The U.S. gets a D- when it comes to testing’

Most Read