San Francisco: Places to go, people to see

In his funny, critically acclaimed one-man show called “Colorstruck,” Donald Lacy fearlessly takes on issues involving racism.

The show, which is onstage this weekend and next at the Buriel Clay Theatre in San Francisco, is particularly relevant in light of instances such as the February publication in San Francisco’s Asian Week newspaper of an inflammatory column about African Americans.

Asian Week, in fact, is sponsoring a public forum at 5 p.m. before Sunday’s performance of the show.

Performances are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday at the African American Art & Culture Complex, 762 Fulton St., San Francisco. Tickets are $10 to $20.

For tickets and information, or to sponsor a teen to attend the event, call (510) 663-5683 or visit www.colorstruck.net.

SHOTGUN WEDDING QUINTET

Five musicians in San Francisco’s Jazz Mafia (who sound like a group of 10) perform a CD release show Friday night. Shotgun Wedding Quintet officially celebrates its new album on a bill featuring co-headliners Crown City Rockers. The lineup also includes Flying Lotus, Plug Research, Willow the Gas Lamp Killer, 4-One-Phonics and DJ Centipede. The show starts at 9 p.m. at the Independent, 628 Divisadero St., San Francisco. Tickets are $15. Visit www.ticketweb.com.

SCHOOL OF ROCK

On Sunday, the Paul Green School of Rock presents its first San Francisco benefit concert, with headliner Jon Anderson of Yes. Proceeds from the show, which also features students, go to music programs for young people. The event also includes a silent auction of rock ’n’ roll items. A VIP pre-show starts at 6 p.m.; the music begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St., S.F. Tickets are $35 to $150. Visit www.musichallsf.com.

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