Alexander V. Nichols’ magnificent set replicates the War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco Opera’s presentation of “The Barber of Seville” at Marin Center in San Rafael. (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera)

Alexander V. Nichols’ magnificent set replicates the War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco Opera’s presentation of “The Barber of Seville” at Marin Center in San Rafael. (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera)

San Francisco Opera’s clever ‘Barber’ lights up the drive-in

Company brings back live shows with satisfying, high-tech production

San Francisco Opera has accomplished the seemingly unfathomable task of bringing the art form to the drive in. On Friday, the troupe opened its historic run of an outdoor 90-minute “The Barber of Seville” to audiences in cars at Marin Center in San Rafael, and it was a treat from start to finish.

Moments during the production, some patrons even felt like they were watching in the War Memorial Opera House — closed for more than a year due to the pandemic — in that Alexander V. Nichols’ amazing, massive and clever set is a remarkable facsimile of the classic Civic Center building.

The deconstructed, abridged adaptation of Rossini’s popular comedy by director Matthew Ozawa isn’t a straightforward narrative, but instead offers up the performers giddily in rehearsal for the opera. It opens with a short, black-and-white silent film (shown on screens at the side of the stage) following them into the War Memorial building, proceeding to their dressing rooms. Soon, they’re each onstage, in upper-level dressing rooms, singing live for the first time in months.

Alternately, the video screens initially briefly reveal what’s going on in a tent backstage: conductor Roderick Cox leading a socially distanced ensemble of San Francisco Opera Orchestra musicians playing their hearts out, wearing masks.

Credit must go to technicians working on the crisp sound, which was excellent throughout the broadcast to car radios. (The opera even supplied transistors for those who couldn’t tune in from their vehicles.)

The singers, performing Marcie Stapp’s excellent concise English translation, clearly were having a blast on opening night of the 11-performance run.

In the title role, baritone Lucas Meachem, casual in slacks and a jean jacket (costumes by Jessica Jahn) got the show off to a great start singing the famed “Figaro” aria while amusingly fussing with wigs and the character’s other props. Tenor Alek Shrader as the lover Almaviva serenaded with a guitar, followed by soprano Daniela Mack as the sweet and sassy Rosina, rearranging flowers and reading a fashion magazine. Bass-baritone Philip Skinner, wearing a robe and boxers, was a riot as Dr. Bartolo, while mezzo-soprano Catherine Cook as Berta, in a leopard-print coat, and commanding bass Kenneth Kellogg as Don Basilio, rounded out the action.

Lucas Meachem portrays the title character in San Francisco Opera’s “The Barber of Seville” at the Marin Center drive-in. (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera)

Lucas Meachem portrays the title character in San Francisco Opera’s “The Barber of Seville” at the Marin Center drive-in. (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera)

The group numbers were thrilling, too, with the singers facing forward, backed by their faces and other dazzling designs projected in huge dimensions.

The creative and technical team provide dazzling high-tech design in San Francisco Opera’s “Barber of Seville.” (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera)

The creative and technical team provide dazzling high-tech design in San Francisco Opera’s “Barber of Seville.” (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera)

The fun production was filled with jokes. Voiceover by an omniscient stage manager cautioned the performers to keep their distance for COVID safety, even issuing a direct warning to real-life husband-and-wife Shrader and Mack, who’s pregnant. At one point, a tape measure was brought out to ensure the order would be followed.

Interestingly, though, while this multimedia “Barber” satisfies the yearnings of fans long awaiting the return of live entertainment, at the same time, it exemplifies the increasingly elemental role of technology in the arts. The Marin Center audience has two sections, with some vehicles getting the up-close stage view — where it admittedly was hard at times to focus on the live person competing with huge projections — while others at the nearby lagoon watched a simulcast on a drive-in screen. At some points, too, the production’s design even resembled Zoom boxes.

While San Francisco Opera seemingly spared no expense to mount such a unique show, with flawless production values and executed impeccably on every level, it remains to be seen if subscribers and fans who miss live music and musicians (many who are still out of work) will take to the drive-in format for the long term.

For now, though, it’s a tonic. And opera lovers in cars on Friday showed their appreciation at the conclusion not by shouting “bravo” but by enthusiastically honking their horns before driving off the Marin Center campus.

REVIEW

The Barber of Seville

Presented by San Francisco Opera

Where: Marin Center, Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael

When: 8 p.m. April 24, April 27, April 30, May 1, May 4, May 7-8, May 11, May 14-15

Tickets: $50 to $250 per vehicle

Contact: (415) 864-3330, sfopera.com

San Francisco Opera’s drive-in production of “The Barber of Seville” runs April 23 through May 15 in San Rafael. (Courtesy Kristen Loken/San Francisco Opera)

San Francisco Opera’s drive-in production of “The Barber of Seville” runs April 23 through May 15 in San Rafael. (Courtesy Kristen Loken/San Francisco Opera)

Classical MusicOperaSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Gov. Gavin Newsom, show here speaking at the City College of San Francisco mass vaccination site in April, faces a recall election due to anger on the right over his handling of the pandemic, among other issues. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Why Gavin Newsom’s popularity could work against him in the recall election

Top pollster: ‘We’re not seeing the Democrats engaged in this election. And that may be a problem…’

Passengers ride the 14-Mission Muni bus on Friday, March 12, 2021. (Jordi Molina/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Transit officials fear Free Muni pilot could hurt already-strained service levels

Supporters say fare cuts could increase ridership, help low-income residents

The vacant property at 730 Stanyan St. in the Haight currently houses a safe sleeping site for the homeless. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Affordable housing project on former McDonald’s site delayed as city adds units

The start of construction on an affordable housing project on the site… Continue reading

Visitors read a notice hanging on the Polk Street entrance to City Hall on Thursday, March 26, 2020, shortly after the building was closed. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City Hall reopening to the public on June 7 after long closure due to COVID-19

San Francisco will reopen City Hall to the public on June 7… Continue reading

Historic streetcars are undergoing testing on The Embarcadero to prepare for their return to service on May 15.<ins></ins>
What to expect for Muni Metro’s relaunch on May 15

Significant service restoration includes downtown subway tunnels and historic streetcars

Most Read