“Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving,” opening Sept. 25 at the de Young Museum, includes some of the artist’s colorful costumes. (Courtesy Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco)

“Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving,” opening Sept. 25 at the de Young Museum, includes some of the artist’s colorful costumes. (Courtesy Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco)

S.F. museums to reopen to the public

Visitor capacity limited to 25 percent as safety measure

After being closed for months as a safety measure during the coronavirus pandemic, The City’s major museums are getting ready to reopen to the public.

On Sept. 25, the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park opens its doors with “Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving,” a collection of the famed artist’s personal items, including photos, costumes and even her prosthetics. Also featured are Kahlo’s art works, including drawings from her time spent in San Francisco that will be on view to the public for the first time.

The Asian Art Museum is opening on Oct. 3, offering free admission to guests through Oct. 12, and special exhibitions including “Awaken: A Tibetan Buddhist Journey Toward Enlightenment” and “Jean Shin | Pause,” an installation made from discarded cell phones.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art reopens on Oct. 4, also with two weeks of free community days and free parking through Oct. 18. The major exhibition on view is “David Park: A Retrospective,” the first major retrospective of the popular Bay Area figurative painter, accompanied by “David Park and His Circle: The Drawing Sessions.” Also, a new series called “Bay Area Walls” showcases site-specific commissions by local contemporary artists.

Following guidelines set by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, daily attendance at the museums will be limited to 25% capacity and safety measures, including sanitizer stations and special signage, will be in place. Visitors must wear masks and maintain social distancing, and interactive aspects of installations and exhibitions may be curtailed. Also, some sections of the museums may be closed.

Museum officials suggest purchasing tickets in advance and visiting their websites — asianart.org, famsf.org, sfmoma.org — for information about pandemic-era hours of operation that accommodate increased cleaning.

Jay Xu, head of the Asian Art Museum, said, “The Asian Art Museum offers new worlds to explore and, with every visit, ensures we are a place of inspiration, insight, and, above all, community. … These are the values that kept us going through temporary closure, through the pandemic, and into the future. These are the values that we all need right now. We can’t wait to welcome you back.”

SFMOMA Director Neal Benezra said, “We are elated to welcome our community back to SFMOMA after more than six months of closure. I’m grateful for our dedicated staff who helped care for the museum and keep its spirit alive during this challenging time, and for the many who helped make it possible to reopen our doors. We look forward to offering visitors a respite from the smoky air and inspiration in our soaring galleries and vibrant exhibitions.”

Museums and GalleriesVisual Arts

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