Ring in the new year with Marga Gomez

Like many people, comedian Marga Gomez is ready to wave goodbye to 2010. Social media madness, the stunning longevity of Sarah Palin and economic mood swings — enough already.

“I spent about three months of the year just on Facebook,” Gomez says. “I think that might be my resolution for next year — to stay away from the computer and talk to people. You know, give them my ‘status updates’ in person.”

Overall, she jokes that 2010 was a bad year for comedians.

“We didn’t have a president that we wanted to knock, even though things were dismal,” she says. “I mean, Sarah Palin, bless the cavity where her heart would be, was there for the comics, but the tea party and Christine O’Donnell — you just think things can’t get any worse, and they do. That’s what 2010 was.”

Still, that does not mean there is not cause for celebration. Far from it.

In fact, Gomez, well-known for her unique comedic soirees, is set to host another bash before 2011 enters the fold. It unravels with revelry in “The Marga Gomez New Year’s Eve Spectacular,” with two shows presented by Theatre Rhinoceros on New Year’s Eve at the Victoria Theatre.

“I love New Year’s,” Gomez says. “It’s my favorite holiday.”

Fans already know that Gomez, one of the most popular comedians in the Bay Area, can deliver a memorable and, more importantly, fun outing. But few may realize that this New Year’s event is the last one Gomez is hosting. After a successful run for six years, the party fades to black in its current incarnation.

“I’m a Gemini,” she says. “I don’t want to do one thing too much. We’ve always had two full houses at the Victoria Theatre, and it would be tempting to do this until I become, well, Dick Clark, but I want to leave at a peak, on a high note.”

Also in the Gomez corral are the unforgettable Natasha Muse and Casey Ley (“The Morning Show,” Pirate Cat Radio), who makes his Theatre Rhino debut.

Dubbed “the funniest and gayest New Year’s Eve event in town,” each outing features a memorable balloon drop — word has it that the balloon is bigger this year — and a premidnight kissing countdown.

Smooth and yet at times sultry lounge music is delivered by favorite DJ O’DJ on the turntables.

As for the banter, expect Gomez to dive into some tributes: “Ricky Martin came out this year. I was the ‘Butch Ricky Martin,’ so now he’s the ‘Thin Marga Gomez.’ It’s good.”

IF YOU GO

The Marga Gomez New Year’s Eve Spectacular

Presented by Theatre Rhinoceros

Where: Victoria Theatre, 2961 16th St., San Francisco
When: 7 and 9 p.m. Friday
Tickets: $30 to $35
Contact: (800) 838-3006, www.therhino.org

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