Shock G of Digital Underground performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards ‘10 at Boisfeuillet Jones Atlanta Civic Center on October 2, 2010, in Atlanta. (Taylor Hill/Getty Images/TNS)

Shock G of Digital Underground performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards ‘10 at Boisfeuillet Jones Atlanta Civic Center on October 2, 2010, in Atlanta. (Taylor Hill/Getty Images/TNS)

Rapper Shock G of Digital Underground found dead in Tampa

Rapper Shock G, who was famous for the hit single “The Humpty Dance,” died Thursday night, according to Digital Underground co-founder Chopmaster J. He was 57.

A report from TMZ said that Shock G, named Gregory Jacobs by birth, died at a hotel in Tampa, Florida.

“Thirty-four years ago, almost to the day, we had a wild idea we can be a hip hop band and take on the world,” wrote Chopmaster J in an Instagram post. “Through it all, the dream became a reality and the reality became a nightmare for some … Rest In Peace my Brotha Greg Jacobs.”

Jacobs was born in Brooklyn, New York, but had multiple stints in Tampa both as a child and later in life. He attended and eventually dropped out of Chamberlain High School in the early 1980s to begin his music career.

In addition to rapping, Shock G was also a respected producer in 1980s and 90s hip hop, working with some of the biggest names in music, such as Dr. Dre and Tupac Shakur.

The cause for Jacobs’ death was not public Thursday night.

Josh Fiallo, Tampa Bay Times

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