Places to go, people to see

San Francisco Recycling and Disposal presents an unusual program featuring art and music created from trash by the agency’s artists-in-residence. The lineup features sculpture by Ellen Babcock, who uses chunks of Styrofoam from the dump and tubes of silicone caulk from the Household Hazardous Waste Facility, in her work. It will be accompanied by the premiere of acclaimed composer Nathaniel Stookey’s “Junkestra” at 7 and 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Saturday. “Junkestra” employs instruments, such as pots and pans, found in the trash; Stookey’s previous compositions have been commissioned by the San Francisco Symphony.

The full event runs from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday at the San Francisco Recycling and Disposal art studio, 503 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco.

Tickets are free. Call (415) 330-1400 or visit www.sfrecycling.com/air.

MASTERS OF FINE ARTS

The San Francisco Art Institute presents its 2007 MFA Graduate Exhibition. More than 80 SFAI students show their work. Admission to the show is free; it’s on display from noon to 6 p.m. today through Saturday at Herbst Pavilion, Fort Mason Center, Buchanan Street and Marina Boulevard, San Francisco.

Call (415) 771-7020 or visit www.sfai.edu.

THE DOCTOR IS IN

The office and laboratory used by the first known surgeon to practice in Palo Alto are re-created in the museum exhibit “Dr. Thomas Williams’ Surgery.” The presentation is part of the Williams House’s centennial celebration at the Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto.

Admission is free; hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays through Sundays. Call (650) 321-1004 or visit www.moah.org.

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