Places to go, people to see

The Killing My Lobster troupe premieres “Killing My Lobster Saves the Day,” a performance of comedic vignettes inspired by comic-book culture and superhero lore. Shows are Wednesday through Friday through June 16 at the Eureka Theater, 215 Jackson St., San Francisco. Tickets are $14 to $17. Call (415) 558-7721 or visit www.killingmylobster.com.

Anne Bluethenthal and Co.

Anne Bluethenthal and Dancers, with guest artists, present “Dances of Carino,” a dance-theater work that explores the paradigm of caring. The performance contains women’s grassroots victory stories, a soft, bluesy physicality, and the sultry tones of Mexican-American musician Silvia Parra. Peformances begin at 8 p.m. Friday and run through June 17 at Dance Mission Theater, 3316 24th St., San Francisco. Tickets are $10 to $20. Call (415) 273-4633 or visit www.abdproductions.org.

Young string virtuosos from across the world compete for big prize

The 22nd annual Irving M. Klein International String Competition will be held Thursday through Sunday at San Francisco State University’s McKenna Theater, with nine young semifinalists vying for the prestigious honor. Sunday’s final round will consist of performances with the Marin Symphony, conducted by Alasdair Neale.

This year, 65 young musicians from 15 countries, ranging in age from 15 to 23, entered the competition. Among the nine semifinalists are six violinists and three cellists, from the U.S., South Korea and Canada. Bay Area participants are violinist Andrea Segar, 20, a Berkeley native, and violinist David McCarroll, 21, from Santa Rosa. Both are studying at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston.

Tickets are free for the first round of competition, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday. Tickets for Friday’s performances, which begin at 7 p.m. are $5 to $10. Tickets for Sunday’s final-round performance with the Marin Symphony are $15 to $35.

Call (415) 282-7160 or visit www.kleincompetition.org for more details.

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