Cabaret singer Darlene Popovic makes her Feinstein’s at the Nikko debut in “Weapons of Mass Distraction.” (Courtesy Lois Tema)

Cabaret singer Darlene Popovic makes her Feinstein’s at the Nikko debut in “Weapons of Mass Distraction.” (Courtesy Lois Tema)

Nov. 2-3: Darlene Popovic, Florence-Days of Destruction, Lido, Caspian, Zen Center conversation, Warren Miller Film Tour, John A. Gunn

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2

Darlene Popovic: The cabaret chanteuse appears in “Weapons of Mass Distraction,” a “pre-election evening of song, love and laughter.” [7 p.m., Feinstein’s at the Nikko, 222 Mason St., S.F.]

Florence-Days of Destruction: The only documentary by director Franco Zeffirelli screens, in association with the exhibition “Books and Mud,” which examines the 1966 flooding that occurred after the embankments of the Arno River broke. [7 p.m., American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina St., S.F.]

Sickness, Old Age and Death-A Conversation: The San Francisco Zen Center presents Lucy Kalanithi (whose late husband Dr. Paul Kalanithi wrote the bestselling “When Breath Becomes Air,”) Grace Dammann, Lennon Flowers and Jennifer Block discussing how illness can create an appreciation for the preciousness of life. [7 p.m., Grace Cathedral, 1100 California St., S.F.]

Lido: The Norwegian producer (Peder Losnegard) is known for his “insatiable appetite for beat-making and a unique take on the interplay between genres.” [8 p.m., Herbst Theatre, 401 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Hip Hop For Change Dia de Los Muertos concert: The Latin-American bill includes Los Rakas, Bayonics, Chuy Gomez and DJ Leydis. [9 p.m., Great Northern, 119 Utah St., S.F.]

The Lion King: The national tour of the musical created by Julie Taymor opens its San Francisco engagement. [8 p.m., SHN Orpheum Theatre, 1192 Market St., S.F.]

Caspian: The Massachusetts post-rock outfit, promoting “Dust and Disquiet,” which the New York Times called “patient, immersive, epic,” headlines a show with The Appleseed Cast, a post-rock band from Kansas. [8 p.m., Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St., S.F.]

Warren Miller Film Tour: “Here, There & Everywhere,” the snow sport action series’ 67th installment, is narrated by Olympic gold medalist Jonny Moseley. [7:30 p.m., Palace of Fine Arts Theatre, 3301 Lyon St., S.F.]

John A. Gunn: The Commonwealth Club hosts the chairman emeritus of Dodge & Cox (who’s been called “the Warren Buffet of the Bay Area”) speaking on “The Secret Sauce of Dodge & Cox’s Investment Strategy.” [7:45 p.m., Outdoor Art Club, 1 W. Blithedale Ave., Mill Valley]

THURSDAY, NOV. 3

Bright Lights-Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds: The film by Alexis Bloom and Fisher Stevens about the beloved mother-and-daughter Hollywood stars opens the San Francisco Film Society’s four-day Doc Stories festival. [7 p.m,, Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., S.F.]

The Last Revel: The trio of multi-instrumentalists from Minnesota call their sound “front porch Americana.” [8:15 p.m., Neck of the Woods, St., 406 Clement St., S.F.]

Filoli Celebrates 100 Years: The exhibit features portraits of the Woodside historic garden estate’s owners William and Agnes Bourn, who established it, and William and Lurline Roth, who purchased it and later saved it for preservation. [10 a.m. to 4 p.m., San Mateo County History Musuem, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City]

The French Had A Name For It 3: The French film noir series begins with two from 1939: Marcel Carne’s “Le jour se leve/Daybreak” followed by an adaptation of “The Postman Always Rings Twice” called “Le dernier tournant/The Last Turn” by Pierre Chenal. [7:30 p.m., Roxie, 3117 16th St., S.F.]

The Dying of the Light: The documentary by Peter Flynn explores the “history and craft of 35mm motion picture presentation through the lives and stories of the last generation of career projectionists.” [7:30 p.m., Yerba Buena Center for the Arts screening room, 701 Mission St., S.F.]

Lauryn Hill: The acclaimed neosoul artist is on her MLH Caravan Tour, which she says, continues “the theme of unity and celebration of the many facets of cultural and artistic beauty throughout the African diaspora.” [7 p.m., Bill Graham Civic, 99 Grove St., S.F.]

Shovels & Rope: The Charleston, S.C. duo writes “literate, Southern Gothic infused songs that exude a dark humor, deep sentiment and the celebration of the genuine, quirky and beautiful things in life.” [8 p.m., Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., S.F.]

LARB Radio Hour: The Los Angeles Review of Books hosts writers Seth Greenland, Laurie Winner and Tom Lutz in an event described as “part variety show, part talk show and part literary digest.” [7 p.m., Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., S.F.]

CalendarCaspianDarlene PopovicFlorence-Days of DestructionLidoWarren Miller Film TourZen Center conversation

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