Nov. 19: Red Molly, mole cookoff and more

Courtesy photo<p>Roots music: Americana trio Red Molly features warm harmonies and high-energy live shows. [8 p.m.

Courtesy photo<p>Roots music: Americana trio Red Molly features warm harmonies and high-energy live shows. [8 p.m.

Who's in town

Andy Cohen, author and host of “Watch What Happens: Live,” appears in conversation with actress Rashida Jones to share Hollywood stories and more. [7 p.m., Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., S.F.]

Lectures

Human trafficking: A screening of “Not My Life,” a documentary about human trafficking around the world, is followed by a panel discussion on how to stop human-rights abuses. [6:30 p.m., World Affairs Council, 312 Sutter St., S.F.]

Thinking about Chiapas: Members of the Chiapas Support Committee discuss a recent trip to Chiapas, Mexico, and mark the 31st birthday of the EZLN, a leftist Zapatista political movement. [7 p.m., Modern Times, 2919 24th St., S.F.]

Literary events

Cooking shows: Journalist Allen Salkin shares his new book, “From Scratch: The Uncensored History of The Food Network.” [6:30 p.m., Omnivore Books on Food, 6885a Cesar Chavez St., S.F.]

Spy novel: Brock Clarke discusses his new novel, “The Happiest People in the World,” a spy novel set in a small town where seemingly everyone has something to hide. [7 p.m., Green Apple Books, 506 Clement St., S.F.]

New fiction: Novelist Nuruddin Farah marks the release of his new book, “Hiding in Plain Sight,” which follows a glamorous fashion photographer in Africa as she vows to raise her slain brother's children. [7 p.m., City Lights, 261 Columbus Ave., S.F.]

At the public library

Native American veterans: A panel discusses the role of Native Americans in the military, and why many Native American veterans lack access to resources for members of the armed forces. [6 p.m., Koret Auditorium, Main Library, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

At the colleges

Orchestra concert: San Francisco State University President Les Wong joins the SF State Orchestra to narrate “Carnival of the Animals.” [7 p.m., Knuth Hall, Creative Arts Building, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave., S.F.]

Art talk: Sculptor Leonardo Drew speaks about the inspiration behind his work. [7 p.m., Timken Lecture Hall, California College of the Arts, 1111 Eighth St., S.F.]

Local activities

Saucy contest: It's mole, mole and more mole at a contest seeking the best iteration of the classic, complex Mexican sauce. [6:30-10 p.m., Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts, 2868 Mission St., S.F.]

Film talk: Australian filmmaker Richard Tuohy discusses his work at a screening of his experimental films. [7 p.m., Exploratorium, Pier 15, S.F.]

Comedy they wrote: Comedians Caitlin Gill and Kim Pierce add plenty of snark to a very special episode of “Murder She Wrote” featuring Kevin Sorbo. [8 p.m., Lost Weekend Video, 1034 Valencia St., S.F.]

Rock show: Garage-rockers The Empty Hearts, featuring members of Blondie, The Cars and The Romantics, are promoting their self-titled debut album. [8 p.m., Addition, 1330 Fillmore St., S.F.]

Roots music: Americana trio Red Molly features warm harmonies and high-energy live shows. [8 p.m., Great American Music Hall, 859 O'Farrell St., S.F.]

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