Paul Weller is on tour with his excellent new album “A Kind Revolution.” (Courtesy Tom Beard)

Nostalgia means little to veteran rocker Paul Weller

Paul Weller says there’s nothing momentous about releasing his 25th album, “A Kind Revolution” on the 40th anniversary of his former band The Jam’s punchy, punk-addled debut LP, “In the City.”

“It might be for someone else, but not for me,” Weller, 59, says. “It’s just another record. If you live long enough, you’ll have lots of anniversaries, but I never really think about it. My head’s really into what I’m doing at that time, not what I did last year or 10 years ago.”

Still, the iconic English rocker promises to play a mix of older and newer tunes when he performs at Berkeley’s UC Theatre on Saturday and San Francisco’s The Fillmore on Sunday.

This lack of sentimentality is what’s driven Weller to experiment with new musical styles with each project.

That’s why The Jam’s retro-mod anthems “Town Called Malice” and “Beat Surrender” sound different from his later band The Style Council’s sophisti-pop love songs “My Ever Changing Moods” and “You’re the Best Thing.”

Since going solo in the early 1990s, his material has had a mostly rock edge with occasional tinges of soul and dance.

“A Kind Revolution” is even more ambitious, seamlessly moving from the R&B-infused “Woo Sé Mama” to the funky “She Moves With The Fayre” and the bluesy “Satellite Kid.” The track “One Tear,” featuring Boy George, manages to maneuver between house, soul and disco.

“I’ve always wanted to try and do something different with each record,” says Weller, “but whether you can actually attain that is another matter. For me, it’s growing up with The Beatles. I was such a massive fan, and every record seemed to take you somewhere else. That’s the benchmark for a recording artist.”

Ever looking forward, Weller is already talking up a song off his next record, which he calls “possibly the best thing I’ve ever written” and intends to release next year.

There’s no nostalgia for The Jam and The Style Council, which means no upcoming reunions.

“I don’t really see the point,” Weller says. “I wouldn’t be able to pull it off and be convincing, because my heart wouldn’t be in it, whatsoever. But when I’m out now, playing my new songs, my heart is in it, because that’s where I’m at at that time. I’m just happy now that I can still come to America, have an audience, play music and have people dig it. I’m really happy doing that.”

IF YOU GO
Paul Weller
Where: Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., S.F.
When: 8 p.m. Oct. 22
Tickets: $49.50
Contact: www.thefillmore.com
Note: Weller also appears at 8 p.m. Oct. 21 at the UC Theatre in Berkeley.A Kind RevolutionBoy GeorgeIn the CityJamOne TearPaul WellerPop MusicShe Moves With the FigureStyle CouncilTown Called MaliceWoo Sé Mama

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