Newsom's wife sues film company

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom's wife Jennifer Siebel Newsom filed a lawsuit against an independent film producer and his company on Monday for allegedly using her $75,000 investment and not following through with prior arrangements or repayment, according to court documents.

Siebel Newsom reportedly made the investment in January 2004 based on the belief that she would be repaid and that she would act in and help produce a film made by China Venture Films, LLC, also known as China Ventures.

A film called “Milk and Fashion,'' which is reportedly essentially the same film she invested in, has already been produced and has been showing in China, according to court documents.

The president of the film company, Jay Rothstein, allegedly created a contract with actress Siebel Newsom while they were both in San Francisco. Siebel Newsom still lives in San Francisco but Rothstein reportedly travels back and forth to China.

In the contract, Rothstein agreed to liability for all the money Siebel Newsom invested despite its success, according to court documents.

He allegedly also agreed to pay her 6.5 percent of all the proceeds made in the U.S.

Siebel Newsom requested a jury trial, a $75,000 repayment, breach of contract and monetary compensation and compensation for other violations, according to court documents.

Rothstein was not immediately available for comment.

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