San Francisco Symphony’s former music director Michael Tilson Thomas has withdrawn from scheduled concerts in October to recover from surgery. (Courtesy Brendan Patoc)

San Francisco Symphony’s former music director Michael Tilson Thomas has withdrawn from scheduled concerts in October to recover from surgery. (Courtesy Brendan Patoc)

MTT, recovering from brain surgery, slated to return to podium in November

Former SF Symphony music director tweets ‘See you soon!’

The San Francisco Symphony announced today that Michael Tilson Thomas underwent a successful emergency operation for a brain tumor at UC San Francisco Medical Center and is continuing therapy and exploring “all possible” treatment options.

On Twitter, the orchestra’s beloved former music director said, “I am very fortunate to be cared for by the excellent team at UCSF and their national and international collaborators. Thank you for your love and prayers. See you soon!”

While MTT, 76, won’t perform in October as scheduled with the National Symphony Orchestra for the Kennedy Center’s 50th Anniversary, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and New World Symphony in Miami, where he is artistic director, he is slated to return to Davies Symphony Hall in The City.

The San Francisco Symphony’s online calendar shows him conducting Mozart’s Three German Dances, Schumann’s Symphony No. 1 and his own composition “Notturno” on Nov. 12-14, and the premieres of William Grant Still’s “Patterns,” Timothy Higgins’ Trombone Concerto with Higgins’ soloing; and Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” on Nov. 18-20.

The conductor laureate served as music director in The City from 1995-2020, his post concluding without extensive in-person festivities due to the pandemic.

Classical MusicSan Francisco

Just Posted

Ahmad Ibrahim Moss, a Lyft driver whose pandemic-related unemployment benefits have stopped, is driving again and relying on public assistance to help make ends meet. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
How much does gig work cost taxpayers?

Some drivers and labor experts say Prop. 22 pushed an undue burden on to everyday taxpayers.

Gov. Gavin Newsom, who visited the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 6 headquarters on Recall Election Day, handily won after a summer of political high jinks.	<ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Lessons from a landslide: Key takeaways from California’s recall circus

‘After a summer of half-baked polls and overheated press coverage, the race wasn’t even close’

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents in the U.S. (Shutterstock)
Why California teens need mental illness education

SB 224 calls for in-school mental health instruction as depression and suicide rates rise

The Kimpton Buchanan Hotel in Japantown could become permanent supportive housing if The City can overcome neighborhood pushback. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Nimbytown: Will SF neighborhoods allow vacant hotels to house the homeless?

‘We have a crisis on our hands and we need as many options as possible’

Most Read