Fiber artist Twinkie Chan signs copies of her new book “Crocheted Abode a la Mode” at ImagiKnit. (Courtesy photo)

Fiber artist Twinkie Chan signs copies of her new book “Crocheted Abode a la Mode” at ImagiKnit. (Courtesy photo)

May 2-3: Twinkie Chan, International Ocean Film Tour, Googling Sex, Vampyr, WordStorm, Apocalyptica, Azadeh Tabazadeh

MONDAY, MAY 2

Twinkie Chan: The San Francisco crochet designer and craft superstar — who makes adorable food-themed scarves and more — hosts a trunk show and signs copies of her new book “Crocheted Abode a la Mode.” [2 to 4 p.m., ImagiKnit, 3897 18th St., S.F.]

International Ocean Film Tour: The third volume of the series presented by Miller Entertainment has 120 minutes packed with inspiring stories from the seas and the best water sports action of the year, along with prizes and product giveaways. [7:30 p.m., Sundance Kabuki, 1881 Post St., S.F.]

Googling Sex: Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a former Google data scientist and New York Times op-ed contributor, explains the differences between what people tell others about their sex lives and what their online searches reveal. in an event from the JCC’s “Uninhibited: About Sex” series. [7 p.m., Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., S.F.]

Vampyr: The S.F. International Film Festival presents Danish master Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1932 horror film — about a village inn, a visiting student, a strange doctor, an old crone and a cursed young woman — accompanied by live music by Mercury Rev and Sion Raymonde of Cocteau Twins. [8 p.m., Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., S.F.]

WordStorm: Students in the literary program Writerscorps celebrate their work in an event that closes with open mic performances. [4:45 p.m., Koret Auditorium, S.F. Public Library, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Apocalyptica: The Finnish cello-based heavy rockers from Helsinki headline a show with 10 Years and Failure Anthem opening. [8 p.m., Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., S.F.]

Play reading series: Playwrights Center of San Francisco hosts a developmental reading of “Mascularity” by Richard Slota, about a gender-fluid cop on a journey toward self-acceptance. [7:30 p.m., Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter St., S.F.]

Poetry night: Seasoned San Francisco poets Ron Sauer and Dan De Vries present their work, followed by an open mic hosted by Jerry Ferraz. [7 to 9 p..m., Bird & Beckett Books and Records, 653 Chenery St., S.F.]

TUESDAY, MAY 3

Azadeh Tabazadeh: The author of the acclaimed “The Sky Detective: A Memoir” shares details from her book about her harrowing escape from Iran in the early 1980s and how she realized her childhood dream of becoming a NASA scientist. [7 p.m., Books Inc. Opera Plaza, 601 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Beach Slang: The Philadelphia band’s catchy, punk infused debut album “The Things We Do To Find People Like Us” has received positive reviews from Billboard, Rolling Stone and AV Club. [7 p.m., Rickshaw Shop, 155 Fell St., S.F.]

Ronn Vigh’s Gay Bash: The comedy writer and producer of the long-running “Harvey’s Funny Tuesdays” in the Castro is back with a gay and gay-friendly stand up comedy series, hosting Marga Gomez, Zach Towers, Natasha Muse, Matt Lieb and Karinda Dobbins this month. [8 p.m., Punch Line, 444 Battery St., S.F.]

The Hub: Sponsored by The Green Arcade Bookstore and McRoskey Mattress Co., the evening of bites, drinks and mingling celebrates the neighborhood’s local businesses and nonprofit organizations; RSVP at eventbrite.com. [6:30 to 8:30 p.m., 1687 Market St., S.F.]

Fear Factory: The 20-year-old metal band from Los Angeles headlines a show also featuring Swedish melodic death metal band Soilwork, Omnikage and Spades and Blades. [8 p.m., Slim’s, 333 11th St., S.F.}

Come to the Garden: In a one-night cinema event, inspirational author Jennifer Wilder Morgan interacts with animated characters and scenery from her book, which describes her personal journey and how she entertained “the possibility of personal divine communication.” [7 p.m., Century Redwood Downtown 20, 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City]

Ali Eteraz: The author launches “Native Believer,” his debut novel that’s an “uproarious, explosive look at one man’s search for identity in an America disfigured by the War on Terror.” [7 p.m., City Lights Booksellers, 261 Columbus Ave., S.F.]

Allison Gilbert: The former TV news producer and author discusses her new book “Passed and Present: Keeping Memories of Loved Ones Alive.” a “how-to manual” offering readers 85 ways to celebrate and honor family and friends they don’t want to forget. [6 p.m., Book Passage, 1 Ferry Building, S.F.]


ApocalypticaAzadeh TabazadehCalendarGoogling SexInternational Ocean Film TourTwinkie ChanVampyrWordStorm

Just Posted

Cabernet Sauvignon grapes sit in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
‘Champagne problems’ and supply chain nightmares: San Francisco’s wine industry is suffering

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

<strong>A lion from Cambodia at the Asian Art Museum, which was acquired from a private collector and dates back to between 1150 and 1225, is one of two pieces identified as a stolen artifact in the leaked Pandora Papers.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Asian Art Museum reckons with Cambodian antiquities of disputed provenance

Pandora Papers revelations accelerate culture shift at museums near and far

Most Read