courtesy photo<p>ABC's of rock: Justin Roberts and the Not Ready for Naptime Players are an indie-rock band with songs about important subjects like school picture day and monsters under the bed. [11 a.m.

courtesy photo<p>ABC's of rock: Justin Roberts and the Not Ready for Naptime Players are an indie-rock band with songs about important subjects like school picture day and monsters under the bed. [11 a.m.

May 17: Bay to Breakers, Justin Roberts and more

Something to read

Daughters of the Samurai: By Janice P. Nimura ($26.95) Young Japanese girls raised in traditional samurai households come to 1870s San Francisco before returning to their homeland to fight for women's education in this historical novel.

Volunteer

Habitat For Humanity: The home-building nonprofit seeks volunteers with and without construction experience to help build new homes in San Francisco and carry out simple repairs. [500 Washington St., S.F.; (415) 625-1029, habitatgsf.org]

Brunch

Sabrosa: The Mexican kitchen's brunch menu includes huevos rancheros with carnitas, avocado Benedict, and Mexican French toast made with brioche and Ibarra chocolate. Traditional tacos are also on the morning menu. [11 a.m.-4 p.m., 3200 Fillmore St., S.F.; (415) 638-6500; www.sabrosasf.com]

Get outside

Bay to Breakers: Put on a fabulous outfit and hit the road for Bay to Breakers, the nation's oldest consecutively run footrace. [8 a.m. start, Howard and Main streets, S.F.; zapposbaytobreakers.com]

Kids' SuperTri: Children 15 and under can compete in a the Kids' SuperTri triathlon, with different running, swimming and biking requirements for different age levels. [8 a.m., Ritz Carlton Half Moon Bay, 3 Miramontes Point Road, Half Moon Bay]

Esprit Park project: Volunteers are needed to weed, mulch and pick up litter at the community park. Light refreshments will be served. [9 a.m.-noon, Esprit Park, Minnesota and 19th streets, S.F.]

Horsing around: In honor of the Presidio's time as an Army base, when more than 500 horses were kept in cavalry stables, kids can make their own toy horses with movable legs. [11 a.m.-4 p.m., Officers' Club, 50 Moraga Ave., Presidio, S.F.; RSVP requested at presidio.gov]

Music

Experimental sounds: John Wiese, who specializes in video and sound installations, is performing alongside a film screening. [7 p.m., The Lab, 2948 16th St., S.F.]

Americana music: Western-swing group Asleep at the Wheel has been rolling for 44 years. [8 p.m., Slim's, 333 11th St., S.F.]

Rock show: Dallas shoegaze outfit True Widow is headlining a show that also includes San Francisco's own King Woman, a noisy cabal fronted by Kristina Esfandiari. [9 p.m., Bottom of the Hill, 1233 17th St., S.F.]

DIY activities

Maker Faire: The two-day Maker Faire concludes with demonstrations, hands-on activities, performances and more. [10 a.m.-6 p.m., San Mateo Event Center, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo]

Children

ABC's of rock: Justin Roberts and the Not Ready for Naptime Players are an indie-rock band with songs about important subjects like school picture day and monsters under the bed. [11 a.m., Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., S.F.]

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