Courtesy photoSinging sensation: Jessye Norman performs John Cage songs during San Francisco Symphony’s American Mavericks Festival.

Courtesy photoSinging sensation: Jessye Norman performs John Cage songs during San Francisco Symphony’s American Mavericks Festival.

Long-awaited American Mavericks festival returns

For those who attended, San Francisco Symphony’s 1996 American Mavericks Festival was remarkable and memorable — particularly how one concert featuring members of the Grateful Dead playing works by Henry Cowell, Edgar Varese, Steve Reich and Lou Harrison reached an audience of Deadheads and veteran symphony subscription holders.

Michael Tilson Thomas, who says maverick composers “push boundaries and explore new sounds,” was in his second year as music director when he created the festival, but it has defined his leadership and tenure.

Listeners developed an understanding and appreciation for American musical mavericks, and a unanimous demand for the festival’s return has been realized: it runs Thursday through March 18 in Davies Symphony Hall, before going  on tour to Chicago, Ann Arbor and New York.

The 2012 festival, prepared with Mills College, San Francisco Conservatory of Music, University of Michigan and New York area universities and conservatories, offers works by American composers and performances by leading musicians, as well as two commissions. John Adams’ “Absolute Jest” for orchestra and string quartet and Mason Bates’ “Mass Transmission” for chorus and electronics are on the program March 15-17.   

Pianist Emanuel Ax performs Morton Feldman’s Piano and Orchestra Concerto March 15-17, and soprano Jessye Norman sings from John Cage’s “Song Books,” in collaboration with pioneering vocalists Meredith Monk and Joan La Barbara Saturday and March 14.

Other participating artists include Jeremy Denk, Kiera Duffy, Paul Jacobs, Newband, PARTCH, the San Francisco Symphony Chorus and the St. Lawrence String Quartet. Other featured path-breaking composers are Charles Ives, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Steve Reich, Terry Riley, Carl Ruggles and David Del Tredici.

In addition to performances, festival activities include educational partnerships, interactive listening guides, pre- and post-concert events, and the release of a new John Adams CD. The festival is accessible through a Peabody Award-winning public radio series and a website produced by American Public Media.

IF YOU GO

American Mavericks Festival

Presented by San Francisco Symphony

Where: Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., S.F.

When: Thursday through March 18

Tickets: $15 to $145; $100 pass for nine events

Contact: (415) 864-6000, www.sfsymphony.org

Schedule:

8 p.m Thursday-Friday: Program I (Copland, Harrison, Ives-Brant)

8 p.m. Saturday and March 14: Program II (Foss, Cowell, Cage, Ruggles)

3 p.m. Sunday: Program III (Cowell, Riley, Subotnick, PARTCH)

8 p.m. March 15-17: Program IV (Bates, Adams, Feldman, Varèse)

2 p.m. March 18: Program V (Monk, Reich, Foss, del Tredici)

artsClassical Music & OperaentertainmentMichael Tilson ThomasSan Francisco Symphony

Just Posted

Salesforce Tower and several other buildings in downtown San Francisco can be seen through the fog; climate scientists report that The City’s beloved mascot may be on the decline. (Courtesy Engel Ching)
Is San Francisco losing its fog? Scientists fear the worst

This isn’t just an identity crisis for San Franciscans. It’s an ecological problem

Outside Lands boasts high-quality food and drink from dozens of purveyors, and many are local. (Courtesy Outside Lands)
Outside Lands is for food lovers

85 food vendors, 40 wineries, 30 breweries make the festival nourishing to gluttonous

California Highway Patrol officers watch as Caltrans workers remove barricades from homeless camp sites as residents are forced to relocate from a parking lot underneath Interstate 80 on Monday, May 17, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco’s broken promise to resolve homeless encampments

‘There is an idea that The City is leading with services, and they are not’

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at San Francisco’s Department of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Gabriela Lopez, Alison Collins and Faauuga Moliga were sworn in to the Board of Education on Jan. 7, 2019. The election date for their possible recall is Feb. 15, 2022. (Ida Mojadad/S.F. Examiner)
The silver lining of San Francisco’s ‘recall fever’

Recalls are an expensive but valuable amplifier for everyday people

Most Read