Leah Busque explains the origins of TaskRabbit

Leah Busque founded TaskRabbit

The founder of TaskRabbit, a online and mobile marketplace where users can post tasks they need completed in exchange for cash, is looking to expand her 3½-year-old operation to Atlanta, Seattle and Austin, Texas. For more info, visit www.taskrabbit.com.

How did you come up with this concept? It actually all started with the dog. I was sitting at home one night with my husband and we were getting ready to go out to dinner. We called a cab to come pick us up when we realized we were out of dog food. We have this 100-pound yellow Lab named Kobe. And we thought, “Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a place online where we could go saying we needed dog food and name the price we were willing to pay?” Four months later, I quit my job at IBM and developed the first version of the site.

In societal terms, what’s the goal of TaskRabbit? If you think back 10 to 15 years ago, there was a kid in your neighborhood that you could pay a couple of bucks to wash your car or mow your lawn. I feel that with the age of the Internet, we’ve lost that sense of community.

How does one apply for TaskRabbit? One of the main questions we get is how do we trust these people. We have a pretty extensive vetting process before they’re activated on the site.

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