COURTESY  PHOTOKalin (White

COURTESY PHOTOKalin (White

Kalin and Myles basking in success

It might sound nostalgic when pop-hip-hop duo Kalin and Myles reflect on their halcyon days attending high school in the Bay Area. But it wasn’t too long ago. Kalin (White, who went to Castro Valley High) and Myles (Parrish, a Dublin High alum) are barely into their 20s, but they have been busy. Among their accomplishments: the EP “Dedication” on their own Republic-distributed K&M Music imprint; an almost sold out three-night “Crazy for Christmas” run at the Regency Ballroom in San Francisco this week; and announcing the huge “Dedication” tour that kicks off in London. They’ve come a long way from awkward early songwriting efforts like “Shake Somethin’” and “Kick it Like Karate.” Myles spoke about their success last week.

Do you guys actually hang out together offstage?

It just depends on the occasion. We kind of have really different personalities – Kalin is really super-social, so he’ll be at a lot of parties whenever we’re in L.A. But I’m more laid-back, I just like to chill and make beats. So a lot of times, we just do our own thing because we’re actually pretty different.

What do you like that Kalin doesn’t?

That whole social atmosphere – I don’t think I ever really fit into that in high school. I’d always feel weird, awkward and uncomfortable at parties. So I’d usually try and avoid those.

And you guys actually met at a movie theater three years ago?

It was the premiere of “Never Say Never,” and we both ended up in the same row. It was crazy. But that’s not where we officially met for the first time – it’s just where we finally crossed paths again. And I was like, “Hey – what’s up? I’ve started to do some music!”

If you’re so different, personality-wise, what kept the conversation going that night?

Just our interest in music. We both had it, from the beginning. And Kalin was able to help me out, confidence-wise. Because he was such a confident guy, whereas I was really lacking in that department, so he helped me get out there more. So it was just kind of like an opposites-attract thing.

And you were already experimenting with beats at home?

Yeah. And then I was just rapping to it, just for fun, then just putting some stuff up on YouTube. And there were a couple of people on YouTube that I subscribed to that I liked a lot, and who I would make some raps for. So it was just more for fun than anything.

Do you guys have a life philosophy already?

We’ve always wanted to show a positive message by looking at different situations positively in our songs. So now we just want to share that and inspire others.

IF YOU GO

Kalin and Myles

Where: Regency Ballroom, 1300 Van Ness Ave., S.F.

When: 8 p.m. Dec. 19-21

Tickets: $21.50 to $199.50

Contact: (888) 929-7849, www.axs.com

artsKalin and MylesKalin WhiteMyles ParrishPop Music & Jazz

Just Posted

Salesforce Tower and several other buildings in downtown San Francisco can be seen through the fog; climate scientists report that The City’s beloved mascot may be on the decline. (Courtesy Engel Ching)
Is San Francisco losing its fog? Scientists fear the worst

This isn’t just an identity crisis for San Franciscans. It’s an ecological problem

The Bay Area is vying to be one of 16 communities,<ins> spread across the U.S., Canada and Mexico,</ins> to host the 2026 FIFA World Cup soccer championships. Games would be played at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara. (Courtesy Bay Area Host Committee, World Cup 2026)
Bay Area launches bid to host World Cup games in 2026

FIFA officials pay San Francisco a visit as they tour prospective venues

The sun sets over the Bay Area, seen from the Berkeley hills on Oct. 18, 2017. “The gauzy fantasy that we are so much better here in the Bay Area because of our diversity, because we are too focused on the future to get hung up on this region’s ugly past, because we’re so much cooler than everywhere else — lets white liberals pretend that the taint of racism can’t reach them here in this shining city on a bunch of hills.” (Andrew Burton/New York Times)
The Bay Area is far from a haven for progressive diversity and harmony

‘I’ve experienced more day-to-day racism in the Bay Area than in the last capital of the Confederacy.’

Carmen Chu, who took over as City Administrator in February, is reorganizing the department into four parts corresponding to related city services. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli/Special to The Examiner)
Report knocks city administrator for inefficiency, lack of transparency

‘A culture that allows corruption to take place’

Most Read