Janeane Garofalo is one lazy performer

Even with extra time on her hands, don’t expect Janeane Garofalo to seize the day or anything. The sardonic stand-up comedian and actress — she recently lent her voice to the animated feature “Ratatouille” and joined the cast of TV’s “24” — will be the first to declare she’s lazy.

“I’m not a real doer,” she says. “I don’t get a lot done in a day.”

With the ongoing Writers Guild strike, Garofalo has found herself milling about at home in New York. With all this new-found free time, what does she do, exactly?

Between eating, smoking and walking her dogs, the pint-sized comic simply enjoys the pleasure of loafing.

“Laying,” she says with a slight chuckle. “I like laying around. I wish I had a better answer, but I’m really pretty lazy.”

But this weekend, she’s performing at Cobb’s Comedy Club with “24” co-star, Mary Lynn Rajskub.

She won’t be partnering with Rajskub for a “24” themed performance. The booking, she says, was merely coincidence; the two happen to be friends on the same show and enjoy doing stand-up together.

“A couple of shows we’ve done have been advertised as the two women of ‘24.’ I can’t think of a less comedic way to advertise because ‘24’ is such a laugh-riot.”

Known for talking shop about politics — she was a fixture on the liberal and progressive Air America Radio program “The Majority Report” — the outspoken comic is certainly as far as it gets from the right.

Having appeared on the left-minded “West Wing,” it’s been a change of sorts moving onto the right-wing-oriented “24.”

The politics of one of the show’s creators aside, Garofalo has found “24” to be an enjoyable experience and is missing her time at work since the strike hit.

Knowing that mainstream shows don’t share her politics, she’s also aware that her casting probably has nothing to do with her beliefs in the first place.

“For a show to share my politics, I’d basically have to be on the Che Guevara Hour,” she says. “Having said that, I’m not hired to be Janeane Garofalo and say what I say and do what I do; I’m hired to be actor number 8 on show number 12.”

As she waits for work on “24” to resume, Garofalo plans on doing stand-up in the interim and hopes to record a stand-up special for DVD in June, which she says could possibly be recorded in San Francisco.

What’s the working title of the stand-up special? “Good question,” she says, “I didn’t even think of that. I should get to work on that. Maybe I’ll call it, ‘I’m Lazy.’”

IF YOU GO

Janeane Garofalo

When: 8 and 10:15 p.m. today and Saturday

Where: Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Columbus Ave., San Francisco

Tickets: $32.50-$33.50

Contact: (415) 928-4320, www.cobbscomedy.com

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