Jaclyn Smith, local stylists make the ‘Shear Genius’ cut

When it comes to hairstyle, the devil may be in the details, but even “Charlie’s Angels” alum Jaclyn Smith is first to admit that she could not think of a better way to enter the reality TV fold than by hosting Bravo’s surprise hit “Shear Genius.”

“It’s certainly a new area for me,” Smith says. “I wasn’t a big fan of reality shows like ‘The Swan’ or ‘Wife Swap.’ but when I tuned into Bravo and saw ‘Project Runway,’ I found real talent at work and that fascinated me. I liked what the network was doing.”

The show, which finds 12 contestants vying for $100,000 and a chance to have their work appear in Allure magazine, debuted to stellar ratings last summer. Season two premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday.

Fans of the hair affair may be blown away by some of the challenges this season. One of them includes a captivating “Charlie’s Angels” match. The end result, sources claim, wasn’t necessarily heaven sent.

This wasn’t the first time Smith was asked to appear in a reality TV show. The producers of ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” have been wooing her for quite some time, but she hesitated to put on dancing shoes.

“I was truly a dancer from the beginning and that’s so much a part of me … I don’t think I would want to do it and not be my very best,” she says.

For “Shear Genius,” she questioned how far the show could go with hair, but was pleasantly surprised.

“Hair really changes a woman more than anything — more than her makeup, more than her clothes,” she says.

As for advice — about life and surviving reality TV contests — she says remaining true to yourself is key. “And to never sacrifice your values,” she notes. “You have to face your fear, don’t hide from it — go out on a limb. That’s where the fruit is.”

Two Bay Area stylists are on the show. Concord resident Nekisa, 29, who grew up in San Francisco. operates Beauty Boutique Salon in Concord. Paulo, 37, is at the helm of Ego Mechanix Salon in San Jose.

“One of my goals was to put San Jose on the map,” Paulo says.

The locals found many of the competitions mind bending, but were more challenged by being confined together as a group. The contestants had no access to phones, magazines, TV, books or the Internet for an entire month.

“But I was able to step out of my box and try something new,” Paulo says. “It made me re-evaluate who I am again. I have been doing hair for almost 19 years, but you have to keep learning in order to grow.”

In the meantime, no reality venture comes without a “villain” and for that, all fingers seem to be pointing toward one hair titan from Denver: Charlie.

Apparently he was no angel at all.

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