Natalie Portman is superb as the title character in "Jackie." (Courtesy Stephanie Branchu/20th Century Fox)

‘Jackie,’ with the remarkable Natalie Portman, is history told anew

Yet another film about the Kennedy family may seem like an eye-rolling prospect, but Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie” is so painfully alive, so painstakingly intimate, it rises above such simple descriptions.

It begins with a wraparound sequence. Jackie Kennedy (a remarkable Natalie Portman) speaks to a reporter (Billy Crudup) in the first days after the assassination of her husband.

She demonstrates astounding power and poise during her storytelling, attempting to shape the events to her satisfaction.

The movie then leaps around like memories, moments out of time, and Mica Levi’s remarkable musical score helps underline the feeling of disjointed, interior episodes.

In flashbacks, director Larrain (director of the Oscar-nominated Spanish-language film “No” and the upcoming “Neruda”) lets his camera continuously trail Jackie, or lead her.

She’s always at the center of the frame, frequently moving, but sometimes captured still, in a moment alone.

Interestingly, Darren Aronofsky, who directed Portman in her Oscar-winning role in “Black Swan,” uses a similar technique, and is credited as a producer here.

“Jackie” shows the assassination, and the confused events that follow. The president’s wife gathers with others, including her equally distraught brother-in-law Bobby Kennedy (Peter Sarsgaard), clearly in shock, vulnerable, and walking a nervous tightrope of control.

She makes arrangements for a long, elegant, but possibly dangerous, funeral march. It could be a historically canny decision, or she could be crazy with grief.

Portman carries most of the weight in “Jackie.” It’s a banner year for her, with all-time career-topping performances here and in the overlooked “A Tale of Love and Darkness.”

Meanwhile, the business of continuing to run the country goes on. Vice President Johnson (John Carroll Lynch) is sworn in as commander-in-chief before anyone has a chance to process the tragedy. Jackie is present at the swearing-in, and, more than anything, she looks hurt.

In other scenes, Larrain re-creates footage of a 1962 television documentary, allowing viewers a peek at the way an elegant, shy Jackie decorated the White House. The interesting juxtaposition demonstrates the movie’s preoccupation with perception and history, and the ways in which those in power try to control and manipulate them.

In a way, Clint Eastwood’s misunderstood “J. Edgar” tackled the same themes, but “Jackie” does so more succinctly and more poetically.

“Jackie” deserves mention alongside Robert Drew’s documentary “Primary” (1960), which covered John F. Kennedy’s run for the White House; Oliver Stone’s paranoid conspiracy theory “JFK” (1991), and the Zapruder film from the assassination. At the same time, it’s something new.

REVIEW
Jackie
three and a half stars
Starring Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard, Greta Gerwig, Billy Crudup
Written by Noah Oppenheim
Directed by Pablo Larrain
Rated R
Running time 1 hour, 39 minutesBilly CrudupDarren AronofskyGreta GerwigJackieJackie KennedyMovies and TVNatalie PortmanPablo LarrainPeter Sarsgaard

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