Inside the Outside Lands festival

Golden Gate Park is a completely different place after dark; for many visitors, it’s a sight unseen.

But that’s about to change Friday, when the mega music festival Outside Lands takes over the green, grassy urban expanse for the weekend.

Considered the Bay Area’s response to Coachella or Bonnaroo, Outside Lands isn’t just the biggest music showcase to hit Northern California this summer, it’s also one for the books: the first concert to shine a light (and maybe even some pyrotechnics?) on the otherwise dark recesses of Golden Gate Park past curfew.

“There have been a number of events over the years in Golden Gate Park,” said Allen Scott, vice president of Bay Area concert promoter Another Planet Entertainment. “The one difference here that I think has been noted is we’re going into nighttime for the first time.”

Who’s the lucky act to make history? Radiohead. Frontman Thom Yorke and his brethren will be the first sanctioned performance ever to play after dark in the park.

Of course, Radiohead’s grand-scale production isn’t the only draw to the multiday ticketed festival.

The joint venture between Another Planet Entertainment, Starr Hill Presents and Superfly Presents boasts 64 bands across six stages with Tom Petty and Jack Johnson rounding out headline duties. Additional acts include: Beck, Wilco, Primus, Steve Winwood, Lupe Fiasco and Ben Harper.

With single-day tickets at $85 a pop and three-day passes coming in at $225.50, Outside Lands is hardly a cheap summer concert. Thankfully, the festival offers up more than just tunes.

The event has been marketed as “an all-encompassing local experience” with specific areas devoted to emerging technology, environmental and energy conservation, local food, wine and art.

If you go

Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival

WHERE: Polo Fields and Speedway Meadow, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

WHEN: 5 p.m. Friday; 1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

TICKETS: $85 single-day ticket; $249.50 single-day VIP; $225.50 for 3-day pass

CONTACT: www.sfoutsidelands.com

Weekend’s top acts

Beck: 6:40 p.m. Friday, Sutro Stage, Lindley Meadow

Radiohead: 8 p.m. Friday, Lands End Stage, Polo Field

Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals: 5:50 p.m. Saturday, Lands End Stage, Polo Field

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers: 7:55 p.m. Saturday, Lands End Stage,
Polo Field

Jack Johnson: 7:40 p.m. Sunday, Lands End Stage, Polo Field

Wilco: 6:35 p.m. Sunday, Twin Peaks Stage, Speedway Meadow

artsentertainmentGolden Gate ParkOther Arts

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