“G Affairs,” a 2018 mystery about police corruption, screens Saturday at the Roxie in the Hong Kong Cinema series. (Courtesy SFFILM)

Hong Kong Cinema offers array of stories, genres

But filmmakers cite difficulties with funding

The seven films screening this weekend at New People Cinema and the Roxie in SFFILM’s ninth annual Hong Kong Cinema series are distinct in storytelling method and subject matter.

Director Jun Li, 27, presents a mainstream treatment of transgender issues in his first feature film, “Tracey.” It’s a subject not previously addressed in Hong Kong’s expansive cinema history.

Director Lee Cheuk-Pan, 33, veers into the experimental realm for a timely murder-mystery on police corruption with “G Affairs.”

And director Jessey Tsang provides a graphic exploration of female sexuality in “The Lady Improper.” It has been edited for its sexual content at previous sceenings, but won’t be at this weekend’s showcase on Sunday.

The slate reflects how today’s new and experienced Hong Kong-based filmmakers desire to tell unique stories. But the odds are still stacked against them.

“When I started working in the industry 14 years ago, there were maybe 100 or 200 Hong Kong movies in one year,” says Lee says in an interview, translated by his wife Justine Wong. “But recently, it’s only like 40 or 50 films a year. It’s kind of hard to have investors invest in something that has no superstar.”

Lee also shares how “G Affairs” was realized only after he received funding from First Feature Film Initiative, a Hong Kong government-backed program through which he was awarded 5.5 million Hong Kong dollars — a little over $700,000 — for the entire production.

Lee’s experience strikes a similar chord with Jun Li, who also was raised, and is based, in Hong Kong.

Both say the film industry is increasingly pressured to cater to mainland Chinese markets. It often means investors make more room for generic, blockbuster-type films with A-list celebrities, and less for original local stories starring new faces.

“A lot of local filmmakers won’t find making Hong Kong films profitable at all,” Li says. “Investors tend to find new directors because we are willing to cut our costs and we are not paid very adequately.”

Rod Armstrong, lead programmer of Hong Kong Cinema, also has noticed the number of unique regional stories coming from Hong Kong dwindling in recent years.

“There was a lot of pressure to make films that could also be released in the mainland, [but] Hong Kong has this reputation for more extreme types and styles of cinema,” Armstrong, who has curated the series since its inception in 2011, says. “That I think caused some directors either to not get funding or perhaps move to another locale to try other types of filmmaking.”

Though a relatively small number of original films premiered in 2018, when “G Affairs” and “Tracey” were released, Lee still sees potential in Hong Kong cinema, citing some continued funding from the government and no creative deficit from Hongkongers.

This weekend’s series should illustrate that.

IF YOU GO

SFFILM Hong Kong Cinema

Where: New People Cinema, 1746 Post St, S.F.; Roxie, 3117 16th St, S.F.

When: Friday through Sunday, July 12-14

Tickets: $14 to $16 per film

Contact: (415) 561-5000, www.sffilm.org

SELECT SCREENINGS

Tracey: 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 12 at New People; 1 p.m. Saturday, July 13 at Roxie

G Affairs: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, July 13 at Roxie

The Lady Improper: 4:30 p.m. Sunday, July 14 at Roxie

Just Posted

SF public defender calls deputy shooting ‘preventable and unnecessary tragedy’

Sheriff identifies four deputies involved in incident that killed dog, allegedly wounded owner

Proposed pay raises for City College administrators anger students, faculty

Large increases come as college cuts classes, trims budget

Fatal Mission Terrace fire takes lives of father and daughter

Neighbors mourn loss of family after early morning blaze

Central Subway project projected to run $55 million over budget

San Francisco’s $1.6 billion Central Subway is roughly $55 million in the… Continue reading

Newsom, Becerra lash out at Trump plan to rescind California emissions standards

In a series of tweets early Wednesday morning, Trump said that revoking California’s authority to impose emissions standards will help make cars more affordable.

Most Read