Hathaway gets down, dirty

Don’t let her pretty face fool you. Anne Hathaway, who plays Agent 99 in the new “Get Smart” movie, wasn’t afraid to get rough and tough alongside co-stars Steve Carell, Alan Arkin and Dwayne Johnson.

“I felt like I was so indulged on the set every day by these guys since I was the only girl,” said Hathaway during a recent interview in Beverly Hills to promote the film, which opens Friday.

“Some days I felt like they were trying to be very polite around me and keep the conversation to a primmer environment,” she says, “and so I would just tell the dirtiest joke I could think of just to put everybody at ease.”

Kicking butt in high heels wasn’t a problem for her, either. She says, “I had excellent training in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’ for how to run around wearing heels. So when it came time to just add some high kicks and jumps, it wasn’t that bad. Having a stunt double that did it much better than me helped, though.”

Hathaway grew up watching the iconic 1960s TV show “Get Smart” thanks to Nick at Nite — and loved it. “It was really fun to revisit it, she says. “I wanted to revisit it because I was one of the last people cast. … I really think that in the final product, we’ve managed to kind of have that silly, sweet yet sophisticated feel that the original series had.”

When it comes to her movies, Hathaway doesn’t worry as much now as she used to about living up to others’ expectations.

“I’m 25 years old and I’ve had tremendous luck in my life in terms of movies that I’ve made for artistic reasons that have gone on to become commercial successes,” she says. “It’s kind of dumb luck. You never know what’s going to hit. Some movies that you think will have mass appeal flop. Other movies you think are going to be limited, make money and way outgross any of your other films.”

For “Get Smart,” Hathaway’s inspiration was Carell, whose work in “The Office” she admires.

Shooting the film’s exciting train scene with him, she says, was “a blast.”

“Yeah, being pulled by the train was definitely our ‘Titanic’ moment,” she says, laughing. “It was like if I jump, you jump. I felt so safe all the time that the danger really never entered my mind. … I was laughing so hard all the time doing it. It was just such a rush. It was just lovely, lovely. It was so exhilarating. It felt like being at the best amusement park ever.”

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