Tears for Fears performs at San Jose's SAP Center on Sunday, September 17th, 2017. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Tears for Fears performs at San Jose's SAP Center on Sunday, September 17th, 2017. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Hall & Oates, Tears for Fears gleefully bring back the ‘80s

It was a rockin’ 1980s revival at SAP Center in San Jose Sunday night, with the belated arrival of Tears for Fears and Daryl Hall and John Oates.

Both acts acknowledged the delay, but there was nothing to be sorry about throughout the thoroughly satisfying concert, making up for a show postponed from July.

A particularly jovial outing, it was the final date the English synth pop band led by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith — whose hits “Everybody Wants to Rule the World,” “Mad World,” “Head Over Heels” and “Shout” sounded fantastic — would be sharing the stage with the hit-making Philadelphia-bred duo.

Tears for Fears performs at San Jose’s SAP Center on Sunday, September 17th, 2017. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Early in show, Oates called it “the last leg of this tour since 1972” and he was only partly joking. With the exception of brief breaks in 1987 and 1993-94, Daryl and John have been on the road together annually for decades; Northern California fans pretty much can plan to mark their calendar for a fall or summer date.

The latter part of the 21st century finds the pair again playing arena shows (in 1999, they graced the Sonoma-Marin fair in Petaluma), a fact they’ve even found surprising.

Perhaps the resurgence in popularity is due to the terrific web and TV show “Live from Daryl’s House,” a down-home gathering in which Hall and guests (from Smokey Robinson to Elle King to this concert’s opener, soulful Allen Stone) get together and play each other’s tunes.

Typically, there’s not much new at an H&O show. The pair is there to play the plentiful hits (from “She’s Gone” to “Out of Touch”) mostly closely to the way they are on the records; they always sound fresh and fantastic.

This time around, much of the audience appeared to be first-time Hall & Oates’ concertgoers, reliving childhood days listening to 1980s radio, gleefully singing along on “Family Man,” “Say It Isn’t So” and “Kiss On My List.”

Daryl played a real grand piano, another seeming first, on his signature tune “Sara Smile,” and stayed at it for the show’s only obscurity, Oates’ “Is It A Star” from the odd, Todd Rundgren-produced 1974 album “War Babies.”

“Maneater,” the second tune, was less urgent, appealingly more loose than usual; the extended jam “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)” — which followed Hall’s semi-political comment, “We live in a strange, dangerous time” — showcased longtime H&O saxophonist Charlie DeChant, whose professionalism was matched by the rest of the awesome band: Shane Theriot on lead guitar, Brian Dunne on drums, Eliot Lewis on keyboard, Klyde Jones on bass and the riotous Porter Carroll on percussion.

Daryl, 71, whose gorgeous hair inexplicably looks like it did in the 1970s (and has a Twitter account), got soulfully wild on the ballad “One on One.”

The more-laid back John, 69, sharing lead vocal duties and the spotlight on “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling,” has a graciousness not typical of rock stars. In San Francisco earlier this year to promote his memoir “Change of Seasons” at the Swedish American Hall, he sang his little-known “Southeast City Window” from 1972’s “Whole Oats,” a tune he hadn’t played live in 40 years and worked up at a fan’s request. concertDaryl HallJohn OatesPop MusicSan JoseSAP CenterTears for Fears

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From left, Roland Orzabal, Jamie Wollam and Curt Smith of Tears for Fears closed their engagement with Hall and Oates Sunday in San Jose.  (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

From left, Roland Orzabal, Jamie Wollam and Curt Smith of Tears for Fears closed their engagement with Hall and Oates Sunday in San Jose. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

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