Greta Morgan is promoting Springtime Carnivore’s second recording “Midnight Room.” (Courtesy Lenae Day)

Greta Morgan is promoting Springtime Carnivore’s second recording “Midnight Room.” (Courtesy Lenae Day)

Greta Morgan evolves with Springtime Carnivore

Former Chicagoan Greta Morgan secured her first record deal with The Hush Sound when she was 15 and in high school. Now 28, the Los Angeles-based keyboardist has lived a lifetime in the interim, leading to her latest solo project, Springtime Carnivore, which issued its ethereal sophomore album “Midnight Room” in October. “I feel like my whole career is just a continuum of fun, inspiring projects and I don’t think too many steps ahead,” says Morgan, who also released two albums with Gold Motel and a recent punk-rock covers disc with La Sera’s Katy Goodman. She adds, “I started very young, so all of my growing pains are preserved forever on YouTube.”

Why go it alone as Springtime Carnivore?

Well, The Hush Sound had put out three albums and gone on indefinite hiatus. Then I played in Gold Motel, and that was also winding down. So I wanted to do something where there was no pressure and no expectation. So my boyfriend at the time suggested, “What if you put out a project anonymously? Just put it up on Bandcamp and see what happens.” So I named it Springtime Carnivore after a title that I had lying around. But I didn’t know that it was going to really become a thing.

Nobody guessed it was you at first, right?

Right. Suddenly. All these blogs started writing about it, a label offered to release my first 7-inch, and all these prominent managers started contacting me. So pretty quickly, all these things fell into place, almost like a happy accident. It wasn’t like, “Oh, I’m going to start a new band called Springtime Carnivore.” Each step of the way simply allowed a new door to open.

How is it finally flying solo?

Each situation totally has its perks. If you’re in a band where you’re working well together, you might draw from each other ideas that you never would have arrived at alone. But for Springtime Carnivore, these are songs that came to me in such a pure state, they felt like they just came out of the ether. So I’m not necessarily longing for a co-writer these days.

You also broke up with your beau of six years before “Midnight Room.” What time of day did its songs arrive?

More at night. For most of my adult life, I would wake up in the morning, make a cup of coffee, and write for four hours – that was how I spent my days. But for this record, I was having trouble sleeping. I was living alone for the first time, and there were many late-night hours that I had – or wanted – to fill with something soothing.

IF YOU GO
La Sera, with Springtime Carnivore
Where: Swedish American Hall, 2174 Market St., S.F.
When: 8:30 p.m. Nov. 4
Tickets: $15
Contact: (415) 431-7578, www.ticketfly.comGolden MotelGreta MorganHush SoundKaty GoodmanLa SeraMidnight RoomPop MusicSpringtime Carnivore

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