Good day: Sept. 23, 2009

Who’s in town

Poet Marilyn Chin talks about “Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen,” her debut novel. [7:30 p.m., Booksmith, 1644 Haight St., S.F.]

Lectures

Chris Anderson: The Wired editor and author of “Free: The Future of a Radical Price” talks about how the most effective price in the new digital marketplace is no price at all. [6:30 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

‘From India to the Bay Area’: Performer Devendra Sharma and playwright Vidhu Singh discuss important issues surrounding the Bay Area’s Indian community. [7:30 p.m., CounterPULSE, 1310 Mission St., S.F.]

Literary events

Book party: Local author Peter Richardson celebrates the release of “A Bomb in Every Issue: How the Short, Unruly Life of Ramparts Magazine Changed America.” [7 p.m., Vesuvio Cafe, 255 Columbus Ave., S.F.]

Mike Miller: The author and organizer talks about “A Community Organizer’s Tale: Money and Power in San Francisco.” [7 p.m., Modern Times Bookstore, 888 Valencia St., S.F.]

At the colleges

Breast cancer forum: “Surviving Breast Cancer: Lifestyle Changes and Patient Resources That Can Make a Difference” is the program’s theme. [6 p.m., UCSF, 1600 Divisadero St., H-3805, S.F.]

At the public library

Book talk: Dolan Eargle discusses “Native California: An Introductory Guide to the Original Peoples From Earliest to Modern Times.” [7 p.m., Excelsior Branch, 4400 Mission St., S.F.]

Social Security: A public affairs specialist from the Social Security Administration discusses Social Security insurance and Medicare. [7 p.m., Western Addition Branch, 1550 Scott St., S.F.]

Local activities

Scorsese salute: “The Metropolitan Hallucinations of Martin Scorsese,” a film series saluting the director, kicks off with a double bill of “Taxi Driver” and “After Hours.” [Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., S.F.; (415) 621-6120]

Mahler festival: The San Francisco Symphony, conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas and joined by baritone Thomas Hampson, presents “Mahler: Origins and Legacies.” [8 p.m., Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Lindy hopping: Lindy in the Square presents its monthly evening of community swing dancing. Dance lessons are followed by an open dance floor. [6 to 8 p.m., Union Square, Powell and Post streets, S.F</em>.]

Dining out

Iluna Basque: “Top Chef” contestant Mattin Noblia is featuring lamb stew, a French dish containing lamb, white wine, potatoes and carrots. It’s served casserole-style. Also, look for two desserts that he’s put on the menu: creme caramel and chestnut creme brulee. [701 Union St., S.F., (415) 402-0011]

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