Good day: Oct. 7, 2009

Who’s in town

Robert S. Mueller III, director of the FBI, discusses cyber threats to national security and what his agency is doing to combat diverse dangers. [Noon, Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

Lectures

David Bosco: The foreign-policy expert and author of “Five to Rule Them All” discusses the United Nations Security Council and the significant purpose it serves. [6 p.m., World Affairs Council, 312 Sutter St., S.F.]

Lynne Joiner: The journalist talks about U.S. Foreign Service Officer John S. Service, who warned against rising communism in China and then was blacklisted at home by Sen. Joe McCarthy. [6 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

Literary events

Amitav Ghosh: The Indian-Bengali author (“Sea of Poppies”), anthropologist and historian appears in conversation. [8 p.m., Herbst Theatre, 401 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Ben Fong-Torres: The San Francisco music journalist talks about “Grateful Dead Scrapbook: The Long, Strange Trip in Stories, Photos, and Memorabilia.” [7:30 p.m., Booksmith, 1644 Haight St., S.F.]

At the colleges

William F. Sharpe: The Nobel Prize-winning economist speaks. [7:30 p.m., Cubberley Auditorium, School of Education, Stanford University, Stanford]

At the public library

Opera talk: The San Francisco Opera Guild presents a lecture on Donizetti’s “The Daughter of the Regiment.” [Noon, Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Fiction lovers workshop: Session covers how to use library databases to select novels that fit your desires. [Noon, Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Room B, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Local activities

Key player: Pianist Yefim Bronfman appears with the San Francisco Symphony. The concert includes Brahms’ “Piano Concerto No. 2.” [8 p.m., Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Living for today: “Rent,” Jonathan Larson’s “La Boheme”-inspired musical about a group of young artists struggling to survive while finding their voices, opens a short run at the Curran Theatre. [8 p.m., 445 Geary St., S.F.]
 
Solo theater: CounterPULSE hosts “Words First,” a showcase for solo performers. Mark Kenward, Wayne Harris and Cherry Zonkowski take the stage. [7:30 p.m., 1310 Mission St., S.F.]

Dining out

Fior d’Italia: Chef Gianni Audieri cooks traditional Italian cuisine, and pasta dishes are half-price Wednesdays. Recent selections include cannelloni with chicken and veal; ribbons of pasta with shredded oxtail and tomato sauce; fettuccine Alfredo; and gnocchi with tomato sauce. The menu also includes soups, salads and veal, chicken, beef, fish and vegetable dishes. [2237 Mason St., S.F., (415) 986-1886]

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