Good Day: Oct. 20, 2010

PERSON IN TOWN

Best-selling author, commentator, and feminist leader Gloria Feldt talks about her new book, “No Excuses.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 601 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

LECTURES

Connie Duckworth: The founder of Arzu Studio Hope discusses her organization’s mission in Afghanistan to implement sustainable community development programs. [6 p.m., Marines’ Memorial Club, 609 Sutter St., S.F.]

Ava Roy: The director of “Hamlet on Alcatraz” and artistic director of the We Players troupe talks about the site-specific production and her approach to theater. [6 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

LITERARY

David Grossman: The award-winning Israeli author talks about “To the End of the Land.” [7 p.m., Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., S.F.]

Ian Morris: The author and scholar talks about “Why the West Rules   for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future.” [7 p.m., Kepler’s Books and Magazines, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park]

Gemma Whelan: The Ireland-born writer and theater director talks about “Fiona: Stolen Child.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View]

Crime fiction: Authors Owen Hill, Jim Nisbet, Summer Brenner, Benjamin Whitmer and Michael Harris take part in a panel talk titled “Hardboiled for Hard Times: Crime in the City.” [7:30 p.m., CounterPulse, 1310 Mission St., S.F.]

COLLEGES

Carlos Pascual: The U.S. ambassador to Mexico speaks. [4:30 p.m., Bechtel Conference Center, Encina Hall, 616 Serra St., Stanford University, Stanford]

Gregory Laughlin: The astronomer gives a nontechnical illustrated talk titled “The Ultimate Fate of the Solar System (and the Music of the Spheres).” [7 p.m., Smithwick Theater, Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills]

PUBLIC LIBRARIES

Opera talk: The San Francisco Opera Guild presents a lecture on the Franco Alfano opera “Cyrano de Bergerac.” [Noon, Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Shakespeare play: The San Francisco Shakespeare Festival presents a performance of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” [6:30 p.m., Richmond Branch, 351 Ninth Ave., S.F.]

CITY

Music of India: Celebrated Indian singer-composer Shubha Mudgal performs a concert. She embraces a wealth of styles, from Hindustani classical to club music. [8 p.m., Dinkelspiel Auditorium, Stanford University, Stanford]

Stand-up comedy: Comedian Nick Kroll, featured in Comedy Central’s “Hot List of ’09,” performs at the Punch Line. [8 p.m., Punch Line Comedy Club, 444 Battery St., S.F.]

History tour: The San Francisco Museum and Historical Society hosts a history walk in San Francisco’s Civic Center. [1 to 3:30 p.m.; meet at Pioneer Monument, Fulton Street between Main Library and Asian Art Museum]

Dance presentation: Alonzo King’s Lines Ballet Dance Center presents a performance in Union Square. [12:30 p.m., Powell and Post streets, S.F.]

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