“Bikes of Wrath,” a movie about Australian friends who attempt to cycle from Oklahoma to California, in honor of John Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Grapes of Wrath,” screens at the Balboa. (Courtesy photo)

Good Day Aug. 28-29, 2019

Bikes of Wrath, Popa Chubby, Hank Denson, Shannon Weber, Grace VanderWaal, Ringo Starr, Anything Goes, San Geronimo

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28

Bikes of Wrath: The film follows five Australian friends as they attempt to cycle 2,600 kilometers from Oklahoma to California in honor of John Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Grapes of Wrath” in an exploration of whether America has progressed since the book was published in 1939. [7:30 p.m., Balboa Theatre, Balboa St., S.F.]

Popa Chubby: The blues rocker describes his style as “the Stooges meets Buddy Guy, Motörhead meets Muddy Waters and Jimi Hendrix meets Robert Johnson.” [9:15 p.m., Boom Boom Room, 1601 Fillmore St., S.F.]

As You Like It-A Play for the Bay Area: Renaissance scholar Edmund Campos and actors appearing in San Francisco Shakespeare Festival’s reimagined production of the classic — which runs in the Presidio from Aug 31. to Sept 8 and and in McLaren Park Sept. 14 to Sept. 22 — discuss the comedy’s themes. [6:30 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic room, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Hank Denson: In “Teachers Relief Live,” the comedian from Atlanta dedicates his act to education, explaining why teachers need to make more money. [8 p.m., Cobb’s Comedy Club, 915 Columbus Ave., S.F.]

Shannon Weber: The social worker speaks about “Show Up Hard: A Road Map for Helpers in Crisis,” a collection of stories and lessons learned over 25 years, which she envisions “as a conversation starter in a world where empathy, resilience and bravery are needed.” [7 p.m., Green Appple Books, 506 Clement St., S.F.]

Gordon Chang and Shelley Fishkin: The editors of “The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental Railroad” speak about the book, which shined needed light on the lives of Chinese people who made up 90 percent of the workforce. [7 p.m., Schultz Cultural Hall, Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto]

Kimberly King Parsons: The author speaks about “Black Light,” her debut collection of “enormously perceptive and brutally unsentimental short stories.” [7:30 p.m., Bindery, 1727 Haight St., S.F.]

Tenderloin Talk Live: The Tenderloin Community Benefit District, a neighborhood support and advocacy group, celebrates its 15th anniversary with an Assessment Renewal Appreciation Party. [6 p.m., PianoFight, 144 Taylor St., S.F.]

THURSDAY, AUG. 29

Grace VanderWaal: The teen singer and ukulele player who won “America’s Got Talent” is playing new music on her 2019 UR So Beautiful Tour. [8 p.m., Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., S.F.]

Anything Goes: Hillbarn Theatre opens its season with a preview performance of the Tony-winning maritime musical with famous music and lyrics by Cole Porter. [8 p.m., 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City]

Ringo Starr: Celebrating the 30th anniversary of his All Starr Band, the drummer is joined by Toto’s Steve Lukather, Santana’s Gregg Rolie, Men at Work’s Colin Hay, multi-instrumentalist Warren Ham, drummer Gregg Bissonette and Hamish Stuart. [8 p.m., Paramount Theatre, 2025 Broadway, Oakland]

San Geronimo: The pyschedelic-roots-Americana band from West Marin and special guests perform Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon” in its entirety. [8 p.m., Chapel, 777 Valencia St., S.F.]

San Francisco Art Institute Faculty Exhibition: “More Than 700 Years” closes with a reception following a conversation between curator Ángel Rafael Vázquez-Concepción and some of the 28 SFAI faculty members whose work appears in the show. [5 to 8 p.m., Walter and McBean Galleries, 800 Chestnut St., S.F.]

Joe Talbot: The director of “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” and fifth generation San Franciscan speaks with Michelle Meow about his experiences making the movie, which captures the past and present spirit of The City. [6:30 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 110 The Embarcadero, S.F.]

Pamela Z: The composer presents “Suitcase,” a solo voice and electronics installation which features “a suitcase as both a bag and a home for a video projection of a vulnerable and inconsolable female subject that occupies it.” [8:30 p.m., Lab, 2948 16th St., S.F.]

Queer as German Folk Noon Film Series: San Francisco Public Library screens Ulrike Ottinger’s “Bildnis einer Trinkerin” (“Ticket of No Return”), a “true cult film” starring Tabea Blumenschein as an alcoholic woman who has encounters with archetypal figures played by underground icons icluding Magdalena Montezuma, Nina Hagen, Kurt Raab and Volker Spengler. [Noon, Main Library, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

Larry Arrington: Part of ODC Theater’s “Unplugged” program showcasing works in progress, the choreographer offers a peek at “No Quarter,” which she calls an “astrological folk dance that investigates Eurocentric cultural tenets through a long lens of time.” [8 p.m., ODC Theater, 3153 17th St., S.F.]

Jeremiah Owyang: The founder of Kaleido Insights, a tech research and advisory firm, speaks on “Modern Wellbeing and The Ironies of Turning to Tech to Become More Human — How Tech Changes Our Minds, Bodies, Communities, and Spaces.” [5:30 p.m., DocuSign Executive Briefing Center, 221 Main St., S.F.]

 

Teen songwriter and ukulele sensation Grace VanderWaal plays The Fillmore on Thursday. (Courtesy Johanna Siring)

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