Fred Everything goes vinyl only for Throwback

Courtesy PhotoDJ Fred Everything focuses on music rather than special effects in his rare live performances.

Nothing against glow sticks, but the epileptic light shows of Deadmau5 and gymnastics of Steve Aoki can seem a bit gaudy, exhausting and derivative for those who’ve been around the block.

Among such purists is Potrero Hill producer, Lazy Days Recordings head and funky, French-Canadian deep house DJ Fred Everything, who headlines the free, 1990s classic house party “Throwback” at Mighty on Saturday (with open bar) — LED light show not included.

“I don’t even think DJs should be onstage,” says the Quebec City-raised Frederic Blais. “I feel like the whole thing has become a bit of a circus. We don’t really need this kind of attention and we don’t need DJs like Steve Aoki breaking his neck because he’s jumping off a trampoline into the crowd.”

Around since 1993, Blais moved to Montreal in 1996 and blew up with “Under the Sun” (2000), “Light of Day” (2004) and “Lost Together” (2008). He launched Lazy Days Recordings in 2005 and moved to San Francisco in 2007.

With 34 releases and counting, the dance music label keeps him busy. He’s also doing remix projects; posting groovy, funky monthly podcasts on Soundcloud.com; and working on a new LP planned for 2013.

The producer plays few live shows, he says, adding that running Lazy Days remained “business as usual” in 2012, even as dance music hit new heights of hype.

“It’s come down to extremely overpaid DJs that are not really doing what they should be doing, which is entertaining a crowd with the music, not with themselves destroying a table or jumping in the crowd,” he say.

Blais will spin an all-vinyl set at “Throwback,” which, he says, “feels funny to say, ‘playing all vinyl,’ because before, there was nothing else. I keep a good collection of my best records and I still buy new and old stuff once in a while when I travel.”

House from the ’90s is undergoing a revival of both the good and bad, he says. “I’m thinking of playing the stuff that sounds like now, but was done before. After ’95, there’s a lot more fusion, a lot of blueprints for what a lot of people now call nu-disco. It could have Latin or disco or anything.”

He adds, “I’m excited. Mighty has probably one of the best sound systems in The City.”

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